COMPLETE SCORE
INTERSTELLAR Original Soundtrack: Star Wheel Constellation Chart Digipak (2014)

INTERSTELLAR
Star Wheel Constellation Chart Digipak

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

November, 2014
16
71:39
WaterTower Music

INTERSTELLAR Original Soundtrack: Deluxe Edition (2014)

INTERSTELLAR: Deluxe Edition

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

November, 2014
24
96:35
WaterTower Music

Digital edition
INTERSTELLAR Original Soundtrack: Illuminated Star Projection Edition (2015)

INTERSTELLAR
Illuminated Star Projection Edition

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

December, 2014
29
131:48
WaterTower Music

REVIEW

Interstellar (ENGLISH)

Interstellar (Hans Zimmer). First of all, we must comment the existing differences between the three editions of Interstellar's soundtrack that are available.

  • Star Wheel Constellation Chart Digipak: the standard edition in CD format, with 16 tracks.
  • Deluxe Edition: the expanded version with 24 tracks, only available in digital format.
  • Illuminated Star Projection Edition: this edition includes an Illuminated Star Projection Box, 2CDs with 29 tracks and 35 minutes of extra music, a decodable light message, liner notes by Christopher Nolan and Hans Zimmer, an extended booklet with Behind The Scenes Scoring Photos, the full MP3 digital download of the Interstellar Soundtrack and the Z+ App Free Download of Soundtrack in DTS Headphone: X Surround Sound to enable listeners to enjoy the Interstellar soundtrack in the most immersive and realistic surround sound the way it sounds in Hans Zimmer's studio.

It is clear that Zimmer + Nolan = lucrative business. Though the equation would continue being fulfilled if we were substituting Nolan for the title of any movie dedicated for massive public, especially if this one is specially original and does not treat of remakes or the second parts itself. The three versions of the soundtrack of Interstellar are so different that it turns out simple to get confused if you don't pay attention to what each one contains.

On the other hand, to date of 2014, only Zimmer is capable of generating multiple editions of a soundtrack (probably only comparable with those of The Hobbit trilogy by Howard Shore, which it also finishes in 2014). Recent examples of it, excluding Interstellar, are Man of Steel (2013) and The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014).

Though such a disparity of formats can anger the fans on having seen that the contents of the physical format and of the digital format are not equivalent. It does not seem to be respectful with the fans that the digital version contains less music than the physical version, forcing them, if they consider it opportune, to acquiring the expensive disc of the overloaded Illuminated edition if they want to listen the 35 extra minutes of music that this edition contains.

One of the things on which we are in the habit of insisting and which only sometimes are done is to place the tracks in chronological order. After having been employed 3 different compilations to edit the same soundtrack at almost simultaneously, there is no sense that the deluxe digital edition includes 8 tracks more than the standard version, and that the illuminated edition (again in CD format) includes 5 more tracks than the deluxe digital edition, and that these tracks have been added as a package at the end of each 2 compilations, without importing by no means its temporary location in the story. A reorder of the tracks had been the suitable thing, which is more bleeding on having treated about a simple enough action. Or is it necessary to call the Tracks' ReOrderman and pay his high fees for deciding which goes before and which later? And placing before the best tracks is not also the best option, since, following that way, the disc goes flat immediately. The same thing happened in the collectors edition of The Dark Knight (2008), on having added a new complete disc with regard to the standard edition, and in that there was not the minor objection in placing the prologue as the first track... of the second disc.

 

NEW ADDED TRACK
Four days after the official release of the soundtrack, the deluxe digital edition has added a new track: No Time For Caution, corresponding to the docking sequence. After a peculiar maneuver in which the deluxe edition of 23 tracks was eliminated from the digital shops to turn to rerelease the 24 tracks version just later, the fans who were coming requesting this track from the release of the soundtrack will be able to enjoy it for the same price, though it seems to be that it is not the exact version with choir and organ listened in the film.

The intention of over sizing all the compilations of the couple Nolan/Zimmer has come to graze the ridiculous. It seems that the simpleness sometimes is complicated to obtain. What would cost to release a CD and a digital versions with all the music of the movie arranged chronologically? So in spite of the evident attention that has lent to the edition of this soundtrack, this, that should be the basic target to reach, has not been obtained. The summary: Interstellar consists in an original album, with an expanded edition (only released in digital format), and with another expanded edition from the latter one, this time only available in CD format. All of this adorned with the movement of the addition of the No Time For Caution track in the digital edition (when the album had already been released without the above mentioned track) and in the illuminated edition (in this one, directly, is not accredited in the track listings). And due to the hurries to add the 24th track to the digital version, evidently, the illuminated edition could not do without it, for what it had time to add it to the album but not of retouching the covers to leave evidences of its existence.

Analyzing it coldly, from a perspective "record label - buyer", it has no sense that a soundtrack, in its birth, has 3 editions, the original album and two expanded ones. What sense has that a soundtrack is born with 2 expanded editions? Set to release 3 editions, why not to do 4. And according to the meter of how pleased the movie to the buyer, like that the buyer should choose the version with more or less quantity of music. Again, the ambition takes precedence over the order, and the result is confused.

On the Illuminated Star Projection Edition, apart from that it appears in a box that includes a led and batteries that projects a starry illumination effect, it includes 2CDs and a booklet. For the very fans of the movie, this functionality of star projection could have sense, but does not contribute with absolutely anything interesting for the fans of Zimmer's music. Those who want to listen to the 5 extra tracks that contains this edition, will have to couch up money and acquire the complete packaging. In addition, the lack of coordination of weeks that existed between the normal and digital releases, opposite to the illuminated version release does that more than one fan could have acquired someone of the 2 versions that were released in time with the movie, and that were sorry of it if they wanted to be able to listen to the extra tracks released weeks later in the illuminated edition. Even those who were buying the digital version in the 4 days before the addition of the track No Time For Caution would have been in a situation never seen, buying an album that would be extended some days later.

The content of the promoted 35 minutes extra with regard to the digital edition turns out to be certainly insipid, does not contribute with any really interesting track with regard to the listened in other versions of the soundtrack, and they seem to be rather forced to lengthen its duration to be able to use as hook against the buyer who expects to listen 35 minutes of Interstellar's new music. Nothing farther from the reality. At least, the content of the booklet centers on the soundtrack. Photos of Zimmer, Nolan, from the recording sessions and meetings and liner notes about the soundtrack complete this edition.

Interstellar (ESPAÑOL)

Interstellar (Hans Zimmer). Lo primero que debemos comentar de la banda sonora de Interstellar son las diferencias existentes entre las tres ediciones que se ponen a la venta.

  • Star Wheel Constellation Chart Digipak: la edición estándar en formato CD, con 16 pistas.
  • Deluxe Edition: la versión expandida de la banda sonora, con 24 pistas, pero tan solo disponible en formato digital.
  • Illuminated Star Projection Edition: edición que incluye una caja especial iluminada con proyección de estrellas, 2 CDs con 29 pistas y 35 minutos extra de música, un mensaje luminoso descodificable, notas de Christopher Nolan y Hans Zimmer, un libreto con fotografías del proceso de composición, descarga de la banda sonora en formato MP3 y la descarga de la aplicación Z+ App, para escuchar la banda sonora en sonido DTS Headphone: X Surround Sound y sumergirse en la música con un sonido surround realista, tal cual se escucharía en el propio estudio de Hans Zimmer.

Está claro que Zimmer + Nolan = negocio lucrativo. Aunque la ecuación seguiría cumpliéndose si sustituyéramos a Nolan por el título de cualquier película para público masivo, sobre todo si ésta es especialmente original y no se trata de remakes o segundas partes. Las tres versiones de la banda sonora de Interstellar son tan distintas que resulta sencillo confundirse si no se presta atención a lo que cada una contiene.

Por otro lado, a fecha de 2014, tan solo Zimmer es capaz de generar múltiples ediciones de una banda sonora (quizás sólo comparables con las de la trilogía de El Hobbit de Howard Shore, que también finaliza en 2014). Ejemplos recientes de ello, Interstellar aparte, son El Hombre de Acero (2013) y The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014).

Aunque tal disparidad de formatos puede enfadar a los aficionados al ver que los contenidos del formato físico y del formato digital no son equivalentes. No parece respetuoso con el aficionado que la versión digital contenga menos música que la versión física, obligándole, si lo estima oportuno, a adquirir el caro disco de la recargada edición iluminada si desea escuchar los 35 minutos extra que esta edición contiene.

Una de las cosas en las que solemos insistir y que sólo a veces se hace es colocar las pistas en orden cronológico. Después de haber trabajado en 3 compilaciones distintas para editar una misma banda sonora de forma casi simultánea, no tiene ningún sentido que las versión deluxe digital incluya 8 pistas más que la versión estándar, y que la versión iluminada (de nuevo en formato CD) incluya 5 más que la versión deluxe digital, y que éstas se hayan añadido como un paquete al final de cada una de las compilaciones, sin importar en absoluto su ubicación temporal en la historia. Un reordenamiento de las pistas hubiera sido lo adecuado, lo cual es más sangrante al tratarse de una acción bastante simple. ¿O hay que llamar al Reordenador de Pistas y pagarle sus elevados honorarios por decidir cuál va antes y cuál después? Y lo de poner antes las mejores pistas tampoco es lo mejor, ya que de esa manera el disco se desinfla enseguida. Ya la edición para coleccionistas de El Caballero Oscuro (2008) se hizo lo mismo, al añadir un disco nuevo completo respecto a la edición estándar, y en la que no se tuvo el menor reparo en situar el prólogo como la primera pista... del segundo disco.

 

NUEVA PISTA AÑADIDA
Cuatro días después del lanzamiento oficial de la banda sonora, la edición deluxe digital ha añadido una nueva pista: No Time For Caution, correspondiente a la escena del atraque espacial. Tras una maniobra algo esperpéntica en la que se eliminó la edición deluxe de 23 pistas de las tiendas digitales para volverla a dar de alta con la versión de 24 pistas justo depués, los fans que venían solicitando esta pista desde la salida a la venta de la banda sonora podrán disfrutarla por el mismo precio, aunque parece ser que no es la versión exacta con coro y órgano escuchada en el film.

La intención de sobredimensionar todas las compilaciones de la pareja Nolan/Zimmer ha llegado a rozar el ridículo. Parece que lo simple a veces es complicado de conseguir. ¿Qué costaría editar una versión en CD y otra digital con toda la música de la película ordenada cronológicamente? Pues a pesar de la evidente atención que se ha prestado a la edición de esta banda sonora, esto, que debería ser el objetivo básico a alcanzar, no se ha conseguido. El resumen: Interstellar consta de una edición original, con una edición expandida solo lanzada en formato digital, y esta última, a su vez, con otra edición expandida, esta vez sólo disponible en formato CD. Todo ello aderezado con el cambalache de la adición de la pista No Time For Caution en las ediciones digital (cuando esta ya se había comercializado sin dicha pista) e iluminada (en la que, directamente, no está acreditada en las carátulas). Y vistas las prisas por añadir la 24º pista a la versión digital, evidentemente la versión iluminada no podía prescindir de ella, por lo que hubo tiempo de añadirla a dicho álbum pero no de retocar las carátulas para dejar constancia de su existencia.

Analizándolo fríamente, desde una perspectiva "sello discográfico - comprador", no tiene sentido que una banda sonora, en su nacimiento, tenga 3 ediciones, una original y dos expandidas. ¿Qué sentido tiene que una banda sonora nazca con 2 ediciones expandidas? Puestos a hacer 3 ediciones, por qué no hacer 4. Y según el medidor de lo que le gustó la película al comprador, así debería elegir la versión con más o menos cantidad de música. De nuevo la ambición prima sobre el orden, y el resultado es confuso.

Sobre la Illuminated Star Projection Edition, al margen de que se presenta en una caja que incluye un led a pilas que proyecta un efecto de iluminación estrellada, incluye 2 CDs y un libreto. Para los muy fans de la película puede tener sentido esta funcionalidad de proyección estelar, que no aporta absolutamente nada interesante para los aficionados a la música de Zimmer. Quienes quieran escuchar las 5 pistas extra que contiene esta edición, tendrán que rascarse el bolsillo y adquirir el pack completo. Además, el desfase de semanas que existió entre el lanzamiento de las ediciones normal y digital frente a la versión iluminada hace que más de un aficionado pueda haber adquirido alguna de las 2 versiones que salieron a tiempo con la película, y que se arrepintieran de ello si deseaban poder escuchar las pistas extras lanzadas semanas más tarde en la versión iluminada. Incluso los que compraran la versión digital en los 4 días previos a la adición de la pista No Time For Caution se habrían encontrado en una situación nunca vista, comprando un álbum que se ampliaría días después.

El contenido de 35 minutos extra promocionado respecto a la edición digital resulta ciertamente insípido, no aporta ninguna pista realmente interesante respecto a lo escuchado en las otras versiones de la banda sonora, y parecen más bien forzadas a alargar su duración para poder servir de gancho frente al comprador que espera poder escuchar 35 minutos de nueva música de Interstellar. Nada más lejos de la realidad. Al menos, el contenido del libreto se centra en la banda sonora. Fotos de Zimmer, Nolan, de las sesiones de grabación y notas sobre la banda sonora completan esta edición.

TRACK LISTINGS
INTERSTELLAR: Star Wheel Constellation Chart Digipak
2014
Total Time: 71:39
Label:
WaterTower Music
  1. Dreaming Of The Crash (3:55)
  2. Cornfield Chase (2:06)
  3. Dust (5:41)
  4. Day One (3:19)
  5. Stay (6:52)
  6. Message From Home (1:40)
  7. The Wormhole (1:30)
  8. Mountains (3:39)
  9. Afraid Of Time (2:32)
  10. A Place Among The Stars (3:27)
  11. Running Out (1:57)
  12. I'm Going Home (5:48)
  13. Coward (8:26)
  14. Detach (6:42)
  15. S.T.A.Y. (6:23)
  16. Where We're Going (7:41)
INTERSTELLAR: Deluxe Edition
2014
Total Time: 96:35
Label:
WaterTower Music
  1. Dreaming of the Crash (3:55)
  2. Cornfield Chase (2:06)
  3. Dust (5:41)
  4. Day One (3:19)
  5. Stay (6:52)
  6. Message From Home (1:40)
  7. The Wormhole (1:30)
  8. Mountains (3:39)
  9. Afraid of Time (2:32)
  10. A Place Among the Stars (3:27)
  11. Running Out (1:57)
  12. I'm Going Home (5:48)
  13. Coward (8:26)
  14. Detach (6:42)
  15. S.T.A.Y. (6:23)
  16. Where We're Going (7:41)
  17. First Step (1:47)
  18. Flying Drone (1:53)
  19. Atmospheric Entry (1:40)
  20. No Need To Come Back (4:32)
  21. Imperfect Lock (6:54)
  22. No Time For Caution (4:06)
  23. What Happens Now? (2:26)
  24. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night (1:39)
  25. Poem by Dylan Thomas
    Recited by John Lithgow, Ellen Burstyn, Casey Affleck, Jessica Chastain, Matthew McConaughey, Mackenzie Foy
INTERSTELLAR: Illuminated Star Projection Edition
2014
Total Time: 131:48
Label:
WaterTower Music
    DISC 1 (71:39)
  1. Dreaming Of The Crash (3:55)
  2. Cornfield Chase (2:06)
  3. Dust (5:41)
  4. Day One (3:19)
  5. Stay (6:52)
  6. Message From Home (1:40)
  7. The Wormhole (1:30)
  8. Mountains (3:39)
  9. Afraid Of Time (2:32)
  10. A Place Among The Stars (3:27)
  11. Running Out (1:57)
  12. I'm Going Home (5:48)
  13. Coward (8:26)
  14. Detach (6:42)
  15. S.T.A.Y. (6:23)
  16. Where We're Going (7:41)
    DISC 2 (60:09)
  1. First Step (1:47)
  2. Flying Drone (1:53)
  3. Atmospheric Entry (1:40)
  4. No Need To Come Back (4:32)
  5. Imperfect Lock (6:54)
  6. What Happens Now? (2:04)
  7. Who's They? (7:17)
  8. Murph (11:21)
  9. Organ Variation (4:52)
  10. Tick-Tock (8:19)
  11. Day One (Original Demo) (3:49)
  12. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night (1:39)
  13. Poem by Dylan Thomas
    Recited by John Lithgow, Ellen Burstyn, Casey Affleck,
    Jessica Chastain, Matthew McConaughey, Mackenzie Foy
  14. No Time For Caution (4:06)
    (does not appear in the track list)
MAKING THE SCORE

Search Film Score...

Latest OST Releases