STAR WARS Original Soundtrack (LP 1977)

STAR WARS

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

1977
16
74:58
20th Century Records

STAR WARS TRILOGY: The Original Soundtrack Anthology (1993)

STAR WARS TRILOGY
The Original Soundtrack Anthology

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

1993
22
87:48
20th Century Fox

Includes music from Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.
Star Wars: A New Hope (Special Edition) Original Soundtrack (1997)

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE
The Star Wars Trilogy Special Edition

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

1997
24
105:48
RCA Victor

Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (ENGLISH)

Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (John Williams). John Williams' music for Star Wars is probably the most memorable soundtrack in the film history. Evaluated inside the original trilogy, its main theme (Luke's theme), as well as many other, are easily memorable, as the theme of the Force, Leia's theme, Yoda, the imperial march, the ewoks, etc. Even themes of diegetic music as the featured in Mos Eisley's cantina have been done very famous and well remembered by the general public worldwide. On the utilization of these leitmotifs for the characters and places, the Star Wars original trilogy is the best example, though it is true that few sagas have lent so well as Star Wars in this type of scoring. The original trilogy of the Star Wars saga shapes one of the best set musical sagas and that offers an excellent thematic consistency, where there can be listened variations of the different themes associated with the different characters in numerous occasions, making that the cinematographic product is firmer and compact, raising the satisfaction of the spectator to the maximum.

About the Episode IV to which here we refer, several editions have been edited. Originally titled Star Wars, was not up to the Special Edition of 1997, coincidental with the revival of the original movies in cinemas with any retouches that George Lucas wanted to introduce, until it be called Star Wars: A New Hope. Later on, in 2004, and with 2 of the 3 movies of the new trilogy already released, it was when there got the number of episode of the series in the name of the movies of the original trilogy, managing to be called Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.

The first edition of the soundtrack composed by John Williams was released in 1977 in a double vinyl format, including big photographies and a poster of the final battle of the Dearth Star. This version was including 74 of the 88 minutes that the soundtrack lasted. It was not until 1986 when Polydor edited the soundtrack in 2-CD format, with the same content of tracks than the original vinyl version of 1977. In 1993, Star Wars Trilogy: The Original Soundtrack Anthology is released, with a sober presentation of the soundtrack of the 3 movies of the original trilogy (Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi) in 4 CDs and with a box and a booklet of extra big size. The first three discs were including the soundtrack of three movies with more music than the published untill then in the official editions of each one, and the fourth disc was including more tracks and alternative versions of the three movies. They supposed 75 tracks and a really exciting film-music experience.

In 1997, with the revival in cinemas of the original trilogy re-dressed under the subtitle of Special Edition, the 3 soundtracks of the original trilogy were re-mastered. In addition, Williams had to compose some new tracks for the new sequences that George Lucas introduced in the Special Edition, more evident in the score of Return of the Jedi. With the incorporation of some previously unreleased themes, finally in this edition it was possible to say that the soundtrack of the 3 movies of the original trilogy was complete. With regard to this edition of Star Wars: A New Hope, one of the distinctive characteristics is the not incorporation of the Main Title in its extended version (the most known), but in the version that really appears in the film. In addition, it includes an extensive booklet with notes on this edition and on each of the tracks.

 

Subsequently, the soundtrack of Episode IV has been edited repeatedly, but without adding new musical content with respect to the editions of 1977, 1993 and 1997. Due to this, these reissues are not included in the superior section of albums information, since they do not improve the musical content edited previously, although its characteristics are detailed below:

STAR WARS EPISODE IV: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack (2004) STAR WARS EPISODE IV: A NEW HOPE
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
2004.
24.
105:48.
Sony Classical.
 

In 2004, a new version is published with the occasion of the first DVD release of the film, in which changes the record label (to Sony Classical) and the art of the covers. The content of this edition is the same than the Special Edition of RCA Victor of 1997, though it does without the notes that this edition was containing.

This edition of the soundtrack is the first one in which it is recorded the number of the episode in the title (numbering that began in 1999 with the soundtrack of the Episode I: The Phantom Menace), since it is the first version commercialized later to the existence of Episodes I, II and III.

STAR WARS TRILOGY Soundtrack (2004) STAR WARS TRILOGY
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
2004.
74.
Compilation.
Sony Classical.
 

Box set that includes the album previously reviewed, in addition to the soundtracks of Episodes V and VI edited by Sony Classical in 2004. The set includes:

  • 6 discs:
    • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (2004 version).
    • Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (2004 version).
    • Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (2004 version).
The Music of STAR WARS 30th Anniversary Collector's Edition (2007) The Music of STAR WARS
30th Anniversary Collector's Edition
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
2007.
87.
Compilation.
Sony Classical.
 

The set includes:

  • 7 discs and 1 CD-ROM:
    • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.
    • Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back.
    • Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
    • The Corellian Edition.
    • CD-ROM.

In 2007, celebrating the 30th anniversary of the first Star Wars film, Sony Classical releases a set in which 8 discs are included. These would be the 6 discs that were edited in 2004 under the same label for three movies, including the original art of the soundtracks in its original editions of 1977, 1980 and 1983. In addition, a seventh disc of 13 tracks was included with a summary of music from the 6 episodes under the name THE CORELLIAN EDITION (that was also released in separated form in 2005), and an eighth disc in a CD-ROM format, which included files of the original LP packaging (perhaps the most attractive thing of this edition and that differs from the previous ones), poster and inserts.

About the edition of 2007, the difference in content with regard to the Star Wars Trilogy edition of 2004 does not add musical value to the compilation. Since it is use to happen in some compilations, the incorporation of insipid extras and lacking in relation with what the soundtrack of a movie should be is certainly irritating. The Corellian Edition is a compilation disc that Sony edited in 2005, taking advantage of the rights on Star Wars music, and that, after the premiere of the Episode III, they could release with a summary of tracks of the 6 episodes of the saga. Its sale in this precise moment might make a commercial well-taken sense, but its incorporation in the 30th Anniversary Edition of 2007, though commercial justified for the label, it is not for the buyer (probably with exceptions). Why does it serve to have a couple of tracks of the episodes IV, V and VI in this compilation if we have the discs with the entire soundtrack of each one? And due that the 30th Anniversary Edition refers to the original trilogy, what sense has to include tracks from the episodes I, II and III? These episodes do not belong to the original trilogy, for what it does not make sense to include them like extras. But due that Sony was possessing the rights of The Corellian Edition and the 30th Anniversary Edition, it was cheap for them to include this disc edited in 2005 inside their compilation of 2007, granting a supposed over value that would affect to the price. On the CD-ROM with digital files of the original LP packaging, poster and inserts, it had been much more interesting to present videos of the recording sessions, the meetings and chats with Williams and Lucas on the music of the movie or a digital version of the discs that accompany this CD-ROM.

STAR WARS: The Ultimate Soundtrack Collection (2016) STAR WARS: The Ultimate Soundtrack Collection
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
January 2016.
121.
Compilation.
Sony Classical.
 

The set includes:

  • 10 discs + 1 DVD:
    • Episodes I, II y III: original single editions of 1999, 2002, 2005.
    • DVD "Star Wars: A Musical Journey" (released together with the Episode III soundtrack in 2005).
    • Episodes IV, V y VI: double editions of 1997/2004.
    • CD with interviews to John Williams and Harrison Ford.
STAR WARS: The Ultimate Vinyl Collection (2016) STAR WARS: The Ultimate Vinyl Collection
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
January 2016.
89.
Compilation.
Sony Classical.
Vinyl edition

The set includes:

  • 11 vinyls:
    • Episodes I, II y III: original single editions of 1999, 2002, 2005.
    • Episodes IV, V y VI: original editions of 1977, 1980, 1983.
STAR WARS: The Ultimate Digital Collection (2016) STAR WARS: The Ultimate Digital Collection
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
January 2016.
89.
Compilation.
Sony Classical
Digital edition

The compilation includes:

  • 89 tracks:
    • Episodes I, II y III: original single editions of 1999, 2002, 2005.
    • Episodes IV, V y VI: original editions of 1977, 1980, 1983.

In January, 2016 and taking advantage of John Williams' return to Star Wars' universe with the premiere weeks before of Episode VII: The Fore Awakens, Sony Classical re-edits the soundtracks of 6 the previous episodes in format of 3 different compilations: CD, vinyl and digital. The musical content of the editions in vinyl and digital is the same, whereas the CD edition includes more tracks of the episodes IV, V and VI, the musical DVD Star Wars: A Musical Journey originally published with the soundtrack of Episode III, and a CD with interviews to John Williams and Harrison Ford.

With regard to the episodes I, II and III, the musical content of three editions (CD, vinyl and digital) is the same, and coincides with that of the original versions of the soundtracks published in 1999, 2002 and 2005. But all of them forget The Ultimate Edition of the Episode I, released in 2000, which included 68 tracks opposite to the 17 of the original 1999 album.

With regard to the episodes IV, V and VI, the CD edition incorporates the tracks of the double CD versions edited in 1997 and 2004, whereas the versions in vinyl and digital format cut away the quantity of tracks up to including the same ones that had the original LPs released in 1977, 1980 and 1983, respecting the track titles and the chronological disorder of those editions.

It is evident that this compilation does not have the object to provide the fan of all the music of the 6 episodes previously published. Especially in the case of the vinyl edition, which includes the original soundtracks of the episodes IV, V and VI, and that seems to be focused to the public of more than 40 years gladly for the vinyl and with nostalgia of the times of the premiere of the original movies, and that, undoubtedly, has a remember taste. Meanwhile, the CD version offers the complete music of the classic episodes, though it forgets great quantity of music of the Episode I, as it has been mentioned before. What is less understood is that the digital version includes the "cut away" original version of the episodes IV, V and VI and not the complete version included in the CD version. On the other hand, the fact of including the original LP versions of the classic trilogy in the vinyl and digital editions has senseless such as that this editions include the tracks Lapti Nek and Ewok Celebration from Return of the Jedi, whereas the CD edition includes the alternative versions of these two tracks that were composed for the Special Edition of the original trilogy released in 1997.

In short, this compilation, for its content and its moment of publication, is a product done to enlarge the raise money effect of the Episode VII: The Force Awakens, more than to improve or complete the Star Wars' musical universe. The collection in vinyl, with the original art of every soundtrack, has an attractive facet on having included exactly the same content than the original editions of the classic trilogy. But looking the publication of this huge compilation, we miss the complete versions of the episodes II and III, the only ones that have not received an expanded treatment and that, in view of the effort of the record label for continuing publishing Star Wars' music, we think that they would be more than justified.

STAR WARS Soundtrack: Limited Edition, Gold-Coloured Vinyl (2016) STAR WARS
Limited Edition: Gold-Coloured Vinyl
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
June 2016.
16.
74:00.
Sony Classical.
Vinyl edition

Edition with restored audio from the original 1977 album, published with vinyl in gold color. Aimed to collectors.

STAR WARS EPISODE IV: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack (2004) STAR WARS
Limited Edition: Picture Disc Vinyl
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
September 2016.
16.
74:00.
Sony Classical.
Vinyl edition

Edition with restored audio from the original 1977 album, includes 4 vinyl decorated with images from the film.

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack (2017) STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
January 2017.
16.
74:50.
Walt Disney Records.
Digital edition

In January 2017, Walt Disney Records reissues the digital soundtrack with the same content as the original 1977 edition. The edition does not include the numbering of the episode and uses the cover of the 1997 limited edition.

After the acquisition of Lucasfilm by The Walt Disney Company in 2012, this edition is the first release of the soundtrack under the Walt Disney Records label.

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack: 40th Anniversary Box Set (2017) STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE
40th Anniversary Box Set
Release date:
Tracks:
Lenght time:
Label:
December 2017.
22.
tbc.
Walt Disney Records.
Vinyl edition

Commemorating the 40th anniversary of the premiere of the film, Walt Disney Records publishes a special version of 3 discs in vinyl format. The first 2 discs present the soundtrack as it was originally published in 1977. Disc 1 also includes a 3D hologram of the Death Star. Disc 3 includes the track The Last Battle, as well as original recordings of the Main Title (takes 16 to 20), which were already included in the Special Edition of 1997. In addition, the edition includes a booklet with texts and unpublished photographs, including some from the recording sessions.

 

The global conclusion is that there has not been still edited a version according to what the mother of the soundtracks would deserve. Seen the example of what was done with the trilogy The Complete Recordings of The Lord of the Rings, we think that Star Wars complete original trilogy would deserve a reboot with a level of detail at least similar to these editions of Howard Shore's music. We believe that both John Williams as composer, and Star Wars as cinematographic saga, are enough over in importance and profitability than The Lord of the Rings. An analysis in depth of the themes in the style of The Complete Recordings, adorned with abundant graphical material would be more than justified. But the begining point should not be that of the complete versions of 1997 and 2004, but the original version of the 1993 trilogy, which has 2 evident advantages opposite to the later editions: the first one, due that some tracks (especially the tracks of Return of the Jedi Ewok Celebration and Lapti Nek) were replaced in the 1997 version with other reintepretations, the fan who remembers the original movies does not have way of listening to this mentioned versions since they disappeared from the compilations later to that of 1997. At least, these tracks should have been included like extras in all the versions later to the Special Edition of 1997. The version of 1993 contains them. And second, in the version of 1993 it has not abused the mixing of several tracks in alone ones, whereas in the versions of 1997 and 2004 there are tracks composed by other tracks that manage to last 10 minutes, which in fact spoils the experience of the listening. It is the Antirule n1 that we emphasize in the Decalogue on things to avoiding in the compilation of a soundtrack.

As for the different editions that have been published, our special preference is for the 1993 Star Wars Trilogy edition, which we consider to be the most elegant. In spite of the fact that it does not include all the music, since it do the editions later to 1997, the presentation of the box, the quantity of tracks and the booklet content as for information, tracks analysis, photos of the recording sessions of the soundtrack and of the filming of the trilogy, as well as multiple sketches of the Star Wars universe and any words of the own John Williams, they do of this the most satisfactory edition. In addition, it is the most complete edition with the music of the original trilogy as is it had the premiere in cinemas. On the other hand, a detail that spoils the 1997 compilation and repeated in the following ones is the incorporation of the track 13. Archival Bonus Track: Binary Sunset (alternate) (2:19) at the end of the disc 1. To begin, being an alternative version should have been located at the end of the disc 2 not to hinder the chronological listening of the soundtrack that in this edition had been achieved. And second, the incorporation of the Main Title Archive, a recording of more than 14 minutes with the 5 original takes of the Main Title located at the end of the track 13, but without being credited in the track list (though it is described inside the booklet of the 1997 edition) and after 2 minutes and 45 seconds of silence. It was not possible to have accredited this extra track and located in the new one? Undoubtedly, it is a detail that spoils the compilation a bit.

Star Wars original trilogy is a forced point in the beginning of the listening of film music of any fan, specially if he/she enjoyed the movies. In spite of continuing filling with enthusiasm new generations, as more time passes from the premiere of the original trilogy, more difficult is that the young persons are interested for this saga with the intensity with which the previous generations did it. During the decades of the 70s, 80s and probably part of the 90s, Star Wars trilogy, apart from telling a good story and deploying a very original and completely new universe, it was the most ultramodern thing as for the science fiction and special film effects, whereas, entered the 21st century, the youngest fans have other model films probably more influential. This diminishes power of this famous saga if it are not the first movies that are seen in the life, at a short age in which comparisons could not do with other later science fiction movies that could devaluate the merit of the saga created by George Lucas.

Star Wars Episodio IV: Una Nueva Esperanza (ESPAÑOL)

Star Wars Episodio IV: Una Nueva Esperanza (John Williams). La música de John Williams para Star Wars es quizás la banda sonora más memorable de la historia del cine. Evaluado dentro de la trilogía original, su tema principal (el tema de Luke), así como muchos otros, son fácilmente recordables, como el tema de la Fuerza, el tema de Leia, Yoda, la marcha imperial, los ewoks, etc. Incluso temas de música diegética como los interpretados en la cantina de Mos Eisley se han hecho muy famosos y bien recordados por el público general a nivel mundial. Sobre la utilización de estos leitmotivs para personajes y lugares, la trilogía original de Star Wars es el mejor ejemplo, si bien es cierto que pocas sagas se han prestado tan bien como Star Wars en este tipo de musicalización. La trilogía original de la saga Star Wars conforma una de las sagas musicales mejor ambientadas y que goza de una consistencia temática sobresaliente, donde pueden escucharse variaciones de los distintos temas asociados a los distintos personajes en numerosas ocasiones, haciendo que el producto cinematográfico sea más firme y compacto, consiguiendo elevar la satisfacción del espectador al máximo.

Sobre el Episodio IV al que aquí hacemos referencia, varias ediciones han sido editadas. Originalmente llamada Star Wars, no fue hasta la Edición Especial de 1997, coincidente con la reposición de las películas originales en cines con algunos retoques que George Lucas quiso introducir, hasta la que pasó a llamarse Star Wars: Una Nueva Esperanza. Más adelante, en 2004, y con 2 de las 3 películas de la nueva trilogía ya estrenadas, fue cuando se introdujo el número de episodio de la serie en el nombre de las películas de la trilogía original, pasando a llamarse Star Wars Episodio IV: Una Nueva Esperanza.

La primera edición de la banda sonora compuesta por John Williams salió a la venta en 1977 en formato de doble vinilo, incluyendo grandes fotografías y un poster de la batalla final en la Estrella de la Muerte. Esta versión incluía 74 de los 88 minutos que duraba la banda sonora. No fue hasta 1986 cuando Polydor editó la banda sonora en formato 2-CD, con el mismo contenido de pistas que la versión original de 1977 en vinilo. En 1993 sale a la venta Star Wars Trilogy: The Original Soundtrack Anthology, con una sobria presentación de las bandas sonoras de las 3 películas de la trilogía original (Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi) en 4 CDs y con una caja y un libreto de tamaño extra grandes. Los tres primeros discos incluían las bandas sonoras de las tres películas con más música de la publicada hasta entonces en las ediciones oficiales de cada una de ellas, y el cuarto disco incluía más pistas y versiones alternativas de las tres películas. Suponían 75 pistas y una experiencia musicocinematográfica realmente excitante.

En 1997, con la reposición en cines de la trilogía original revestidas bajo el subtítulo de Edición Especial, las 3 bandas sonoras de dichas películas fueron remasterizadas. Además, Williams tuvo que componer algunas nuevas pistas para las nuevas secuencias que George Lucas introdujo en dicha Edición Especial, más evidentes en el score de El Retorno del Jedi. Con la inclusión de algunos temas nunca antes puiblicados, por fin en esta edición se podía decir que la banda sonora de las 3 películas de la trilogía original estaba completa. Respecto a esta edición de Star Wars: Una Nueva Esperanza, una de las características distintivas es la no inclusión del Main Title en su versión extendida (la más conocida), sino en la versión que realmente sale en el film. Además, incluye un extenso libreto con notas sobre esta edición y sobre cada una de las pistas.

 

Posteriormente, la banda sonora del Episodio IV se ha editado en repetidas ocasiones, pero sin añadir nuevo contenido musical respecto al de las ediciones de 1977, 1993 y 1997. Debido a ello, estas reediciones no se incluyen en el apartado superior de información de los álbumes, dado que no mejoran el contenido musical editado anteriormente, aunque sus características pasan a detallarse a continuación:

STAR WARS EPISODE IV: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack (2004) STAR WARS EPISODE IV: A NEW HOPE
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
2004.
24.
105:48.
Sony Classical.
 

En 2004 se lanza una nueva versión con motivo de la comercialización de la primera edición en DVD de la película, en la que cambia el sello discográfico (a Sony Classical) y el arte de las carátulas. El contenido de esta edición es el mismo que el de la Edición Especial de RCA Victor de 1997, aunque prescinde de las notas que esa edición sí contenía.

Esta edición de la banda sonora es la primera en la que se hace constar el número del episodio en el título (numeración que comenzó en 1999 con la banda sonora del Episodio I: La Amenaza Fantasma), dado que es la primera versión comercializada con posterioridad a la existencia de los Episodios I, II y III.

STAR WARS TRILOGY Soundtrack (2004) STAR WARS TRILOGY
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
2004.
74.
Compilación.
Sony Classical.
 

Estuche que incluye el álbum anteriormente reseñado, además de las bandas sonoras de los episodios V y VI editadas por Sony Classical en 2004. El estuche incluye:

  • 6 discos:
    • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (versión de 2004).
    • Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (versión de 2004).
    • Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (versión de 2004).
The Music of STAR WARS 30th Anniversary Collector's Edition (2007) The Music of STAR WARS
30th Anniversary Collector's Edition
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
2007.
87.
Compilación.
Sony Classical.
 

El estuche incluye:

  • 7 discos y 1 CD-ROM:
    • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.
    • Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back.
    • Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
    • The Corellian Edition.
    • CD-ROM.

En 2007, Sony Classical lanza un set en el que se incluyen 8 discos aprovechando que se cumplían 30 años desde el estreno de la primera película de Star Wars. Estos serían los 6 que se editaron en 2004 bajo el mismo sello para las tres películas, incluyendo el arte original de las bandas sonoras en sus ediciones originales de 1977, 1980 y 1983. Además, se incluyó un séptimo disco de 13 pistas con extractos de música de los 6 episodios bajo el nombre THE CORELLIAN EDITION (que salió a la venta de forma separada en 2005), y un octavo disco en formato CD-ROM, que incluía archivos del arte de los LPs originales (quizás lo más atractivo de esta edición y que difiere respecto a las anteriores), posters y otros archivos digitales.

Sobre la edición de 2007, la diferencia de contenido respecto a la edición Star Wars Trilogy de 2004 no aporta valor musical a la compilación. Como suele suceder en algunas compilaciones, la inclusión de extras insípidos y carentes de relación con lo que la banda sonora de una película debería ser es ciertamente irritante. The Corellian Edition es un disco recopilatorio que Sony editó en 2005, aprovechando los derechos sobre la música de Star Wars, y que, tras el estreno del Episodio III, podía lanzar a la venta con un resumen de pistas de los 6 episodios de la saga. Su venta en ese preciso momento podría tener un sentido comercial justificado, pero la inclusión en la edición 30 Aniversario de 2007, aunque comercialmente justificado para el sello, no lo está para el comprador (quizás con excepciones). ¿Para qué sirve tener un par de pistas de los episodios IV, V y VI en esta compilación si tenemos los discos con la banda sonora completa de cada uno de ellos? Y dado que la edición 30 Aniversario se refiere a la trilogía original, ¿qué sentido tiene incluir pistas de los episodios I, II y III? Estos no pertenecen a la trilogía original, por lo que no tiene sentido incluirlos como extras. Pero dado que Sony poseía los derechos de la edición corelliana y de la edición 30 Aniversario, le salía barato incluir este disco editado en 2005 dentro de su compilación de 2007, otorgándole un supuesto sobre valor que repercutiría en el precio. Sobre el CD-ROM con archivos digitales del arte de los LPs originales, posters y folletos, hubiera sido mucho más interesante presentar vídeos de las sesiones de grabación, charlas con Williams y Lucas sobre la música de la película o una versión digital de los discos que acompañan a este CD-ROM.

STAR WARS: The Ultimate Soundtrack Collection (2016) STAR WARS: The Ultimate Soundtrack Collection
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Enero 2016.
121.
Compilación.
Sony Classical.
 

El estuche incluye:

  • 10 discos + 1 DVD:
    • Episodios I, II y III: ediciones sencillas originales de 1999, 2002, 2005.
    • DVD "Star Wars: A Musical Journey" (publicado conjuntamente con la banda sonora del Episodio III en 2005).
    • Episodios IV, V y VI: ediciones dobles de 1997/2004.
    • CD con entrevistas a John Williams y Harrison Ford.
STAR WARS: The Ultimate Vinyl Collection (2016) STAR WARS: The Ultimate Vinyl Collection
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Enero 2016.
89.
Compilación.
Sony Classical.
Edición vinilo

El estuche incluye:

  • 11 vinilos:
    • Episodios I, II y III: ediciones sencillas originales de 1999, 2002, 2005.
    • Episodios IV, V y VI: ediciones originales de 1977, 1980, 1983.
STAR WARS: The Ultimate Digital Collection (2016) STAR WARS: The Ultimate Digital Collection
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Enero 2016.
89.
Compilación.
Sony Classical
Edición digital

La compilación incluye:

  • 89 pistas:
    • Episodios I, II y III: ediciones sencillas originales de 1999, 2002, 2005.
    • Episodios IV, V y VI: ediciones originales de 1977, 1980, 1983.

En enero de 2016 y aprovechando la vuelta de John Williams al universo de Star Wars con el estreno semanas antes del Episodio VII: El Despertar de la Fuerza, Sony Classical reedita las bandas sonoras de los 6 episodios anteriores en formato de 3 compilaciones distintas: CD, vinilo y digital. El contenido musical de las ediciones en vinilo y digital es el mismo, mientras que la edición en CD aporta más pistas de los episodios IV, V y VI, el DVD musical Star Wars: A Musical Journey, originalmente publicado con la banda sonora de Episodio III, y un CD con entrevistas a John Williams y Harrison Ford.

Respecto a los episodios I, II y III, el contenido musical de las tres ediciones (CD, vinilo y digital) es el mismo, y coincide con el de las versiones originales de las bandas sonoras publicadas en 1999, 2002 y 2005. Pero todas ellas se olvidan de la edición The Ultimate Edition del Episodio I, editada en 2000, que aportaba 68 pistas frente a las 17 del álbum original de 1999.

Respecto a los episodios IV, V y VI, la edición en CD incorpora las pistas de las versiones en doble CD editadas en 1997 y 2004, mientras que las versiones en vinilo y digital recortan la cantidad de pistas hasta incluir las mismas que tenían los vinilos originales editados en 1977, 1980 y 1983, respetando los títulos y el desorden cronológico de aquellas ediciones.

Es evidente que esta compilación no tiene el objeto de proveer al aficionado de toda la música de los 6 episodios publicada con anterioridad. Sobre todo en el caso de la versión en vinilo, que incluye las bandas sonoras originales de los episodios IV, V y VI, y que parece enfocada al público de más de 40 años con gusto por el vinilo y añoranza de los tiempos del estreno de las películas originales, y que sin duda tiene su punto remember. Mientras, la versión en CD ofrece la música completa de dichos episodios, si bien olvida gran cantidad de música del Episodio I, como antes se ha mencionado. Lo que se entiende menos es que la versión digital incluya la versión "recortada" original de los episodios IV, V y VI y no la versión completa incluida en la versión en CD. Por otro lado, el hecho de incluir las versiones originales de la trilogía clásica en las versiones en vinilo y digital redunda en sinsentidos tales como que dichas versiones incluyen las pistas Lapti Nek y Ewok Celebration de El Retorno del Jedi, mientras que la edición en CD aporta las versiones alternativas de esas dos pistas que se compusieron para la Special Edition de la trilogía original estrenada en 1997.

En resumen, esta triple compilación, por su contenido y su momento de publicación, es un producto hecho para agrandar el efecto recaudatorio del Episodio VII: El despertar de la Fuerza, más que para mejorar o completar el universo musical de Star Wars. La colección en vinilo, con el arte original de cada banda sonora, tiene un punto atractivo al incluir exactamente el mismo contenido de las ediciones originales de la trilogía clásica. Pero ante la publicación de esta mastodóntica compilación, echamos en falta las versiones completas de los episodios II y III, los únicos que no han recibido un tratamiento expandido y que, visto el esfuerzo del sello discográfico por seguir publicando la música de Star Wars, creemos que estarían más que justificadas.

STAR WARS Soundtrack: Limited Edition, Gold-Coloured Vinyl (2016) STAR WARS
Limited Edition: Gold-Coloured Vinyl
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Junio 2016.
16.
74:00.
Sony Classical.
Edición vinilo

Edición con el audio restaurado a partir del álbum original de 1977, se publica con vinilo color dorado. Dirigido a coleccionistas.

STAR WARS Soundtrack: Limited Edition, Picture Disc Vinyl (2016) STAR WARS
Limited Edition: Picture Disc Vinyl
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Septiembre 2016.
16.
74:00.
Sony Classical.
Edición vinilo

Edición con el audio restaurado a partir del álbum original de 1977, incluye 4 vinilos decorados con imágenes de la película.

STAR WARS: UNA NUEVA ESPERANZA Soundtrack (2017) STAR WARS: UNA NUEVA ESPERANZA
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Enero 2017.
16.
74:50.
Walt Disney Records.
Edición digital

En enero de 2017, Walt Disney Records reedita la banda sonora en versión digital con el mismo contenido que la edición original de 1977. La edición prescinde de la numeración del episodio y utiliza la carátula de la edición limitada de 1997.

Tras la compra de Lucasfilm por parte de The Walt Disney Company en 2012, esta edición es la primera comercialización de la banda sonora bajo el sello de Walt Disney Records.

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack: 40th Anniversary Box Set (2017) STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE
40th Anniversary Box Set
Fecha de lanzamiento:
Pistas:
Duración:
Sello:
Diciembre 2017.
22.
pte.
Walt Disney Records.
Edición vinilo

Conmemorando el 40 aniversario del estreno de la película, Walt Disney Records edita una versión especial de 3 discos en formato vinilo. Los 2 primeros discos presentan la banda sonora como se editó originalmente en 1977. El disco 1, además, incluye un holograma 3D de la Estrella de la Muerte. El disco 3 incluye la pista The Last Battle, así como grabaciones originales del Main Title (tomas 16 a 20), y que ya fueron incluidas en la Special Edition de 1997. Además, la edición incluye un libreto con textos y fotografías inéditas, incluyendo algunas de las sesiones de grabación.

 

La conclusión global es que aún no se ha editado una versión acorde con lo que la madre de las bandas sonoras merecería. Visto el ejemplo de lo que se hizo con la trilogía de The Complete Recordings de El Señor de los Anillos, creemos que la trilogía original completa de Star Wars merecería un reboot con un nivel de detalle al menos similar al de estas ediciones de la música de Howard Shore. Creemos que tanto John Williams como compositor, como Star Wars como saga cinematográfica, están bastante por encima de la importancia y rentabilidad que de El Señor de los Anillos. Un análisis en profundidad de los temas al estilo The Complete Recordings, aderezado con abundante material gráfico estaría más que justificado. Pero el punto de partida no debería ser el de las versiones completas de 1997 y 2004, sino la versión original de la trilogía de 1993, que tiene 2 ventajas evidentes frente a las ediciones posteriores: la primera, dado que algunas pistas (sobre todo las pistas de el Retorno del Jedi Ewok Celebration y Lapti Nek) fueron sustituidas en la versión de 1997 por otras reinterpretaciones, el aficionado que recuerde las películas originales no tiene manera de escuchar dichas versiones ya que desaparecieron de las compilaciones posteriores a la de 1997. Al menos como extras, estas pistas deberían haber sido incluidas en todas las versiones posteriores a la Edición Especial de 1997. La versión de 1993 sí las contiene. Y segundo, en la versión de 1993 no se ha abusado de la mezcla de varias pistas en una sola, mientras que en las versiones de 1997 y 2004 hay pistas compuestas por otras pistas que llegan a durar 10 minutos, lo que de veras estropea la experiencia de la escucha. Es la Antirregla nº1 que destacamos en el Decálogo sobre cosas a evitar en la compilación de una banda sonora.

En cuanto a las distintas ediciones que se han publicado, nuestra especial preferencia es para la edición de Star Wars Trilogy de 1993, que consideramos la más cuidada. A pesar de que no incluye toda la música, como sí hacen las ediciones posteriores a 1997, la presentación de la caja, la cantidad de pistas y el contenido del libreto en cuanto a información, análisis de las pistas, fotos de las sesiones de grabación de la banda sonora y del rodaje de la trilogía, así como múltiples bocetos del universo Star Wars y algunas palabras del propio John Williams, hacen de esta edición la más satisfactoria. Además, es la edición más completa con la música de la trilogía original tal cual se estrenó en cines. Por otro lado, un detalle que estropea la compilación de 1997 y repetida en las siguientes es la inclusión de la pista 13. Archival Bonus Track: Binary Sunset (alternate) (2:19) al final del disco 1. Para empezar, siendo una versión alternativa debería haberse ubicado al final del disco 2 para no estorbar la escucha cronológica de la banda sonora que en esta edición se había conseguido. Y segundo, la inclusión del Main Title Archive, una grabación de más de 14 minutos con las 5 tomas originales del Main Title ubicadas al final de la pista 13, pero sin ser reseñado en el listado de pistas (aunque sí en el libreto de la edición de 1997) y tras 2 minutos y 45 segundos de silencio. ¿No se podía haber acreditado esta pista extra y ubicado en una nueva? Sin duda es un detalle que afea un poco la compilación.

La trilogía original de Star Wars es un punto obligado en el inicio de la escucha de música cinematográfica de cualquier aficionado, especialmente si disfrutó de las películas. A pesar de seguir entusiasmando a nuevas generaciones, cuanto más tiempo pasa desde el estreno de la trilogía original, más difícil se hace que los jóvenes aficionados se interesen por esta saga con la intensidad con la que lo hicieron las generaciones anteriores. Durante las décadas de los 70, 80 y quizás parte de los 90, la trilogía de Star Wars, aparte de contar una buena historia y de desplegar un universo muy original y completamente nuevo, era lo más vanguardista en cuanto a la ciencia ficción y efectos especiales cinematográficos, mientras que, entrados en el siglo XXI, los aficionados más jóvenes tienen otros referentes cinematográficos a su disposición quizás más influyentes. Esto resta poder a esta famosa saga si no es uno de los primeros filmes que se ven en la vida, a una corta edad en la que no se puedan hacer comparaciones con otras películas de ciencia ficción posteriores que puedan devaluar el mérito de la saga creada por George Lucas.

STAR WARS
1977
Total Time: 74:58
Label:
20th Century Records
  1. Main Title (5:20)
  2. Imperial Attack (6:10)
  3. Princess Leia's Theme (4:18)
  4. The Desert and the Robot Auction (2:51)
  5. Ben's Death and TIE Fighter Attack (3:46)
  6. The Little People Work (4:02)
  7. Rescue of the Princess (4:46)
  8. Inner City (4:12)
  9. Cantina Band (2:44)
  10. The Land of the Sandpeople (2:50)
  11. Mouse Robot and Blasting Off (4:01)
  12. The Return Home (2:46)
  13. The Walls Converge (4:31)
  14. The Princess Appears (4:04)
  15. The Last Battle (12:05)
  16. The Throne Room and End Title (5:28)
STAR WARS TRILOGY: The Original Soundtrack Anthology
1993
Total Time: 87:48
Label:
20th Century Fox
    DISC 1: STAR WARS (74:05)
  1. Twentieth Century Fox Fanfare with CinemaScope Extension (Alfred Newman, 1954) (0:22)
  2. Main Title (5:23)
  3. Imperial Attack* (6:41)
  4. The Desert / The Robot Auction (2:51)
  5. The Little People Work (4:08)
  6. The Princess Appears (4:06)
  7. The Land of the Sand People (2:55)
  8. The Return Home (2:48)
  9. Inner City* (4:44)
  10. Mouse Robot / Blasting Off (4:03)
  11. Rescue of the Princess (4:48)
  12. The Walls Converge (4:33)
  13. Ben's Death / TIE Fighter Attack (3:51)
  14. Princess Leia's Theme (4:23)
  15. The Last Battle (12:13)
  16. The Throne Room / End Titles (5:32)
*contains previously unreleased music
    DISC 2: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (not listed)
    DISC 3: RETURN OF THE JEDI (not listed)
    DISC 4: Outtakes and previously unreleased music from
    STAR WARS • THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK • RETURN OF THE JEDI   (74:59)
  1. Twentieth Century Fox Fanfare with CinemaScope Extension (Alfred Newman, 1954) (0:22)
  2. Main Title (alternate) (a)* (2:16)
  3. Heroic Ewok / The Fleet Goes into Hyperspace (c)* (3:05)
  4. A Hive of Villainy (a)* (2:12)
  5. Destruction of Alderaan (a)* (1:31)
  6. Drawing the Battle Lines / Leia's Instructions (b)* (4:02)
  7. The Ewok Battle (c)* (2:48)
  8. Attack Position (b)* (3:04)
  9. Crash Landing (b)* (3:35)
  10. Cantina Band (a) (2:46)
  11. Lapti Nek (c) (2:48)
  12. Cantina Band #2 (a)* (3:44)
  13. Faking the Code (c)* (4:10)
  14. Brother and Sister (c)* (3:08)
  15. Standing By (a)* (1:14)
  16. Leia is Wounded / Luke and Vader Duel (c)* (2:57)
  17. Carbon Freeze / Luke Pursues the Captives / Departure of Boba Fett (b)** (11:08)
  18. Losing a Hand (b)* (5:20)
  19. The Return of the Jedi (alternate) (c)* (5:03)
  20. Leia Breaks the news (alternate) / Funeral Pyre for a Jedi (film version) (c)* (2:27)
  21. Ewok Celebration (film version) (c) / End Credits (film version) (b)* (6:22)
(a) Star Wars     (b) The Empire Strikes Back     (c) Return of the Jedi
*previously unreleased     **previously unreleased, except "Departure of Baba Fett"
STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE - The Star Wars Trilogy Special Edition
1997
Total Time: 105:48
Star Wars Special Edition
Label:
RCA Victor
    DISC 1 (57:33)
  1. 20th Century Fox Fanfare (Alfred Newman, 1954) (0:23)
  2. Main Title / Rebel Blockade Runner (2:14)
  3. Imperial Attack (6:43)
  4. The Dune Sea of Tatooine / Jawa Sandcrawler (5:01)
  5. The Moisture Farm** (2:25)
  6. The Hologram / Binary Sunset (4:10)
  7. Landspeeder Search / Attack of the Sand People** (3:20)
  8. Tales of a Jedi Knight** / Learn About the Force* (4:29)
  9. Burning Homestead (2:50)
  10. Mos Eisley Spaceport (2:16)
  11. Cantina Band (2:47)
  12. Cantina Band #2 (3:56)

  13. ARCHIVAL BONUS TRACK:
  14. Binary Sunset (alternate)* (2:19) / Main Title Archive** (14:40)
    DISC 2 (48:15)
  1. Princess Leia's Theme (4:27)
  2. The Millennium Falcon / Imperial Cruiser Pursuit** (3:51)
  3. Destruction of Alderaan (1:32)
  4. The Death Star / The Stormtroopers* (3:35)
  5. Wookie Prisoner / Detention Block Ambush (4:01)
  6. Shootout in the Cell Bay / Dianoga (3:48)
  7. The Trash Compactor (3:07)
  8. The Tractor Beam / Chasm Crossfire (5:18)
  9. Ben Kenobi's Death / Tie Fighter Attack (3:51)
  10. The Battle of Yavin (9:07)
  11. (Launch from the Fourth Moon / X-Wings Draw Fire / Use The Force)
  12. The Throne Room / End Title (5:38)
* previously unreleased        ** contains previously unreleased music

Search Film Score...

Publication date: 4/30/2015. Last Update: 11/13/2017.
Página publicada: 30/04/2015. Última actualización: 13/11/2017.