THE LION KING Original Soundtrack (1994)

THE LION KING

, Elton John and Tim Rice
  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

1994
12
46:27
Walt Disney Records

THE LION KING Original Soundtrack: Special Edition (2003)

THE LION KING: Special Edition

, Elton John y Tim Rice
  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

2003
14
52:08
Walt Disney Records

THE LION KING Original Soundtrack: The Legacy Collection (2014)

THE LION KING: The Legacy Collection

, Elton John y Tim Rice
  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

2014
33
121:05
Walt Disney Records

The Lion King (ENGLISH)

The Lion King (Hans Zimmer, Elton John and Tim Rice). The new line of CDs Walt Disney Records, The Legacy Collection, will re-edit the soundtracks of some of Disney's classic movies. And to begin, The Legacy Collection releases the soundtrack of The Lion King, an edition with the songs of Elton John, the complete score of Hans Zimmer and some extras.

If we had to make a list of the most waited albums to have a reissue at the level of its music, The Lion King would occupy the first place of the same one. And it is that, just for being the album for which Hans Zimmer earned his only Oscar (till now, 2014), besides that Elton John and the lyricist Tim Rice also were earning the Oscar for the song Can You Feel The Love Tonight, it would look like a sufficient motive for the commercial exploiting of the music of the movie. Both prizes are, undoubtedly, a sample of the great musical level of the soundtrack of The Lion King, but it seems to be that, 20 years before, Disney did not have it so clear, and preferred to edit an album of songs inspired by the movie as Rhythm of the Pride Lands before to re-edit the soundtrack to the style that now it does, depriving the fans of the wonderful score created by Zimmer, under our opinion, the best of his career. Two more songs, Circle of Life and Hakuna Matata were nominated to the Oscar, for what a complete edition of this soundtrack was necessary from the same year of its production. And it is that, how many movies can presume to have 4 nominations to the Oscar only contributed by its musical section?

Don't understand that Rhythm of the Pride Lands is not a good album, which it is, and even it allows us to discover more re-adapted music of Zimmer, which, in the original album, was remaining clearly short. And not uselessly, the importance of this second album was such that supposed the seed of the idea of adapting The Lion King to the format of musical theatre, obtaining a great success for all the countries for those it have been represented. But Rhythm of the Pride Lands should have been an extension of the complete album that we now analyze. Not even the 2003 edition, so excitement when it was announced, as disappointing for not contributing with any more than 2 extra tracks, one of them the remix of the song Can You Feel The Love Tonight, contributed anything new of Zimmer's score. When will the labels learn that the remixes do not contribute any added value to the editions of the soundtracks? It is music not present in the film and, therefore, lacking in apparent value. An interesting added to complete the musical panorama of the movie: YES; an inducement to buy the soundtrack for its only existence: NOT. We insist, we almost prefer doing without remixes of songs that they do not do but to show off to be a refill, thing that angers us enough. If the album has 10 tracks, we hope they were 10 tracks of music of the movie, as are listened in the movie, or submitted to the minimal edition to make them presentable for their incorporation in the album for sale. But there must be included neither one, nor two, nor three, nor four remixes of each of the songs sung with the apparent intention of serving to the public a product improved with regard to the original version, because it is not. In this respect, The Lion King: The Legacy Collection is sincere, and the added ones that suppose the main content of the disc 2 are music of the movie in other versions created by Elton John (for the songs), or the demos of some tracks of the score created by Zimmer (which have the value to show the process that a track can suffer along its composition). Though it is also true that this disc has the a padding appearance: in its 12 tracks, only 5 we might consider as "A" content of the edition, they are The Morning Report, Warthog Rhapsody and the 3 Elton John's versions for the songs listened during the film. The Zimmer's score demos, which will be able to turn out to be more or less interesting according to the listener, we might qualify them as "B" content, that is to say, not principal, not contained as in the movie, though not for it lacking in value. In this respect, and before that to do a remix of anyone of Elton John's versions (like it was done in the 2003 edition), has much more sense includes the sung theme Warthog Rhapsody, theme that does not appear in the film but that was created for the same one (and that was included in Rhythm of the Pride Lands), though it was discarded of the final edition of the film. This one is music created for the movie, and, for it, it is very valuable that is included in this edition, opposite to any remix, which it is not another thing that a posteriori edition of some theme of the film thought to influence the album commerciality, not the quality and genuineness of its content.

Saying this, The Lion King: The Legacy Collection has almost everything that anyone can hope from the edition that Disney owed to The Lion King. Almost all. After beginning the hearing, the first theme, the famous Circle of Life, changes name, Nants' Ingonyama being added as the second part of the theme, which is a sample of care of this edition, since the first theme is a mixing between Elton John's composition, and Hans Zimmer and Lebo M's work. Therefore, it seems to be correct to avoid making think that the first track is a theme exclusively sung, when it is a sung theme that, in turn, serves as score. The second and most important detail of The Legacy Collection is the chronological ordination of the tracks, interlacing songs with parts of the score, which allows to listen and to recall through the movie, without jumps of scenes, thing that happens in 99 % of the soundtracks, that they seem to be undertaken not to use the chronological order of the tracks as one of its premises.

On the other hand, the booklet turns out to be succinct. The note of the producer Don Hahn is very interesting (with general comments on Zimmer and the score), but it seems too short, even more if we are accustomed to the extensive comments of complete and expanded editions of the type of which La La Land Records does, which, in this respect, they continue being the number one of the panorama of the complete editions. Among the brief notes, probably the most impressive information there commented is that Hans Zimmer didn't want to compose the music of The Lion King because he didn't have felt a special affinity towards the animation films. It was the opportunity to do something to share with his 6-year-old small daughter what finally led him to accepting the project. And what interesting that he earned his first Oscar for a soundtrack that he did not want to do. Life's stuffs. It is better not to think what we would have got lost if Zimmer, finally, had rejected the project. With regard to information about the tracks of the booklet, only Warthog Rhapsody and the demos of the disc 2 have a brief explanatory comment of what they are and where they are located inside the story. It is a shame that a more extensive note dedicated to all the tracks of the album has not included.

But there are neither other musical creations of the movie not composed by Zimmer nor Elton John not included in the album, as "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" (sung by Timon and Pumbaa in the moment before Nala's attack and that is adapted in the album Rhythm of the Pride Lands), "I've Got to Lovely Bunch of Coconuts" y "It's to Small World" (both sung by Zazu while he remains caged by Scar). On the other hand, "Hawaiian War Chant" (Tahuwa - Huwai) is included at the end of the track This Is My Home, in the moment in which Timon and Pumbaa dance the hula to distract the hyenas. If The Morning Report and Warthog Rhapsody have been included not forming a part of the final version of the movie, these tracks (though brief) might have meant the musical colophon if they had been included.

In any case, the presence of parts of the score that were not commercialized before, like the chase through the elephants graveyard (though it was included in the international version of the album under the title of The Hyenas), the game between Mufasa and Simba under the stars in I Was Just Trying to Be Brave (moment drawn in the posterior art of the album), the complete versions of the Stampede and Mufasa Dies (undoubtedly, one of the saddest and intense moments of Disney's movies); the depression of adult Simba that Zimmer catches to the perfection in Kings of the Past, besides the flight of Simba's "essence", recreated with the game of the strings of the cellos, together with the moment in which Rafiki realizes that Simba "is alive" (undoubtedly, one of the best moments of the score); the chat between Simba and Mufasa's spirit in Remember Who You Are, apart from the epic moment of the final fight between Simba and Scar in The Rightful King, agglutinate, finally, these musical details that stayed in the memory of the public and that they were missing in the original soundtrack.

On the other hand, the final mixing of tracks is slightly improvable. Certain tracks are clearly sub divisible in other shorter and independent tracks: the Simba's escape separated from Mufasa's death in Mufasa Dies track; the chat between Timon, Pumbaa and Simba on what the stars are, separated from Simba's depression and Rafiki's discovery that Simba is alive in Kings of the Past; the discussion between Simba and Nala, besides the moment in which Rakiki finds Simba, separated from the part in which Rafiki opens the eyes of Simba with phrases like "he lives in you" and "remember who you are" in Remember Who You Are; apart from separating the beginning of the final credits from the rest of the track The Rightful King. And due that the CD edition disregards in many cases of the habitual gap of silence between tracks, turning out to be a practically constant hearing, in spite of the changes of track, it might have got improved being scrupulous with the division of tracks and not to spare effort in the quantity of the same ones to concatenate several of them in one longer track. According to this, at least four more tracks might have been added of having followed this advice. And it is that, for the fan of film music, the scout of the music is important, but also it is the reading of the track titles, which are located them accurately in the concrete moment of the movie that is listened. And as more tracks were included, more precise and pleasant will turn out the soundtrack experience.

About the art of the album, there is created by the Spanish artist Lorelay Bové, as The Legacy Collection's common line for all its releases, which gives to the edition a different and almost lordly aspect, which surprises and pleases to equal. And it is that do the front cover without the art type that had supposed including the typical movie frame has turned out to be a good choice. The rest of the content of the booklet is reduced to the incorporation of the lyrics of the songs (something very valuable, especially with Disney, and that any soundtrack with original song created expressly for the movie should always include) and some sketches of the process of drawing of Disney's artists during the creation of the animated characters of the movie. Also succinct, but that adds a note of color to the album and an oxygenating aspect out of the strictly musical.

With regard to the packaging, though good and beautiful there has the problem that it is "opened" concept, which will cause to the entry of dust. A closed box does not have to be ugly but surer. In any case, only for include the whole Zimmer's score, this edition will satisfy to every fan of the music of The Lion King.

El Rey León (ESPAÑOL)

El Rey León (Hans Zimmer, Elton John y Tim Rice). La nueva línea de CDs Walt Disney Records, The Legacy Collection, reeditará las bandas sonoras de algunas de las películas clásicas de Disney. Y para comenzar, The Legacy Collection pone a la venta la banda sonora de El Rey León, una versión con las canciones de Elton John, el score completo de Hans Zimmer y algunos extras.

Si tuviéramos que hacer una lista de los álbumes más esperados para tener una reedición a la altura de su música, El Rey León ocuparía el primer puesto de la misma. Y es que, tan solo por ser el álbum por el que Hans Zimmer ganó su único Oscar (hasta ahora, 2014), además de que, por su parte, Elton John y el letrista Tim Rice también ganaran el Oscar por la canción Can You Feel The Love Tonight, parecería motivo suficiente para explotar comercialmente la música de la película. Ambos premios son, sin duda, una muestra del gran nivel musical de la banda sonora de El Rey León, pero parece ser que, 20 años atrás, Disney no lo tenía tan claro, y prefirió editar un álbum de canciones inspiradas en la película como Rhythm of the Pride Lands antes que reeditar la banda sonora al estilo que ahora hace, privando a los aficionados del maravilloso score creado por Zimmer, bajo nuestra opinión, el mejor de su carrera. Dos canciones más, Circle of Life y Hakuna Matata fueron nominadas al Oscar, por lo que una edición completa de su banda sonora era necesaria desde el mismo año de su producción. Y es que ¿cuántas películas pueden presumir de tener 4 nominaciones a los Oscar tan sólo por su apartado musical?

No se entienda que Rhythm of the Pride Lands no es un buen álbum, que lo es, e incluso nos permite descubrir más música reversionada de Zimmer, la cual, en el álbum original, se quedaba claramente corta. Y no en vano, la importancia de este segundo álbum fue tal que supuso la semilla de la idea de adaptar El Rey León al formato de teatro musical, cosechando un gran éxito por todos los países por los que se ha representado. Pero Rhythm of the Pride Lands debería haber sido una extensión del álbum completo que ahora analizamos. Ni siquiera la edición de 2003, tan ilusionante cuando se dio a conocer, como decepcionante por no aportar nada más que 2 pistas extra, una de ellas el remix de la canción Can You Feel The Love Tonight, aportó nada nuevo del score de Zimmer. ¿Cuándo aprenderán las casa discográficas que los remixes no aportan valor añadido a las ediciones de las bandas sonoras? Es música no presente en el film y, por tanto, carente de valor aparente. Un añadido interesante para completar el panorama musical de la película: SÍ; un aliciente para comprar la banda sonora por su sola existencia: NO. Insistimos, casi preferimos prescindir de remixes de canciones que no hacen sino aparentar estar para rellenar, cosa que nos enfada bastante. Si el álbum tiene 10 pistas, esperamos que sean 10 pistas de música de la película, tal cual se escucha en la película, o sometidas a la mínima edición para hacerlas presentables para su inclusión en el álbum para la venta. Pero no se deben incluir ni uno, ni dos, ni tres, ni cuatro remixes de cada una de las canciones cantadas con la aparente intención de servir al público un producto mejorado respecto a la versión original, porque no lo es. En este sentido, The Lion King: The Legacy Collection es sincero, y los añadidos que suponen el grueso del contenido del disco 2 son música de la película en otras versiones creadas por Elton John (para las canciones), o las demos de algunas pistas del score creado por Zimmer (las cuales tienen el valor de enseñar el proceso que una pista puede sufrir a lo largo de su composición). Si bien también es cierto que este disco tiene la apariencia de relleno: de las 12 pistas, tan sólo 5 podríamos considerar como contenido “A” de la edición, que son las The Morning Report, Warthog Rhapsody y las 3 versiones de Elton John para las canciones escuchadas durante el film. Las demos del score de Zimmer, que podrán resultar más o menos interesantes según el oyente, podríamos calificarlas de contenido “B”, es decir, no principal, no contenido tal cual en la película, aunque no por ello carente de valor. En este sentido, y antes que hacer un remix de cualquiera de las versiones de Elton John (como se hizo en la versión de 2003), tiene mucho más sentido incluir el tema cantado Warthog Rhapsody, tema que no aparece en el film pero que sí fue creado para el mismo (y que se incluyó en Rhythm of the Pride Lands), si bien se cayó de la edición final de la cinta. Esta sí es música creada para la película, y por ello es muy valorable que se incluya en esta edición, frente a cualquier remix, que no es otra cosa que una edición a posteriori de algún tema del film pensada para influir en la comercialidad del álbum, no en la calidad y autenticidad de su contenido.

Dicho esto, The Lion King: The Legacy Collection es casi todo lo que se puede esperar de la edición que Disney le debía a El Rey León. Casi todo. Nada más empezar la audición, el primer tema, el famoso Circle of Life, cambia de nombre, añadiéndosele Nants’ Ingonyama como segunda parte del tema. Lo cual es una muestra de lo cuidado de esta edición, ya que el primer tema es una mezcla entre la composición de Elton John, y el trabajo de Hans Zimmer y Lebo M. Por tanto, parece correcto evitar hacer pensar que la primera pista es un tema cantado exclusivamente, cuando es un tema cantado que a su vez sirve de score. El segundo e importantísimo detalle de The Legacy Collection es la ordenación cronológica de las pistas, entrelazando canciones con partes del score, que permite escuchar y rememorar la película de principio a fin, sin saltos de escenas, cosa que sucede en el 99% de las bandas sonoras, que parecen comprometidas a no utilizar el orden cronológico de las pistas como una de sus premisas.

El libreto, por otro lado, resulta escueto. La nota del productor Don Hahn es muy interesante (con comentarios generales sobre Zimmer y el score), pero sabe a poco, más si estamos acostumbrados a los extensos comentarios de ediciones completas y expandidas del tipo de las que hace La La Land Records, que en este sentido siguen siendo los número uno del panorama de las ediciones completas. De entre las breves notas, quizás la información más reveladora allí comentada es la de saber que Hans Zimmer no quería componer la música de El Rey León al no sentir una especial afinidad hacia el cine de animación. Fue la oportunidad de hacer algo que poder compartir con su hija pequeña de 6 años lo que finalmente le llevó a aceptar el proyecto. Y qué curioso que ganara su primer Oscar por una banda sonora que no quería hacer. Cosas de la vida. Es mejor no pensar lo que nos habríamos perdido si Zimmer, finalmente, hubiera rechazado el encargo. Respecto a información sobre las pistas del libreto, tan solo Warthog Rhapsody y las demos del disco 2 tiene un brevísimo comentario explicativo de lo que son y donde se ubican dentro de la historia. Una pena que una nota más extensa dedicada a todas las pistas del álbum no se haya incluido.

Pero hay otras creaciones musicales de la película no compuestas por Zimmer ni Elton John no incluidas en el álbum, como "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" (cantada por Timón y Pumba en el momento previo al ataque de Nala y que sí se versiona en el álbum Rhythm of the Pride Lands), "I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts" y "It's a Small World" (cantadas ambas por Zazú mientras permanece enjaulado por Scar). Por otro lado, "Hawaiian War Chant" (Tahuwa- Huwai) sí está incluida al final de la pista This Is My Home, en el momento en que Timón y Pumba bailan el hula hula para distraer a las hienas. Si The Morning Report y Warthog Rhapsody se han incluido no formando parte de la versión final de la película, estas pistas (aunque breves) sí podrían haber significado el colofón musical si se hubieran incluido.

En cualquier caso, la presencia de partes del score que no se comercializaron antes, como la persecución por el cementerio de elefantes (aunque sí fue incluida en la versión internacional del álbum bajo el título de Las Hienas), el juego entre Mufasa y Simba bajo las estrellas de I Was Just Trying to Be Brave (y de cuyo momento se hace eco el arte posterior del álbum), las versiones completas de la estampida (Stampede) y la muerte de Mufasa (Mufasa Dies) (sin duda uno de los momentos más tristes e intensos de la filmografía de Disney); la depresión de Simba adulto que Zimmer capta a la perfección en Kings of the Past, además del vuelo de la “esencia” de Simba, recreada con el juego de las cuerdas de los cellos, junto con el momento en que Rafiki se da cuenta de que Simba “está vivo” (sin duda uno de los mejores momentos del score); la charla entre Simba y el espíritu de Mufasa en Remember Who You Are, aparte del épico momento de la lucha final entre Simba y Scar de The Rightful King, aglutinan por fin esos detalles musicales que quedaron en la memoria del público y que se echaban muchísimo de menos en la banda sonora original.

Por otro lado, la mezcla final de pistas es levemente mejorable. Ciertas pistas son claramente subdivisibles en otras pistas más cortas e independientes: la huida de Simba separada de la muerte de Mufasa en Mufasa Dies; la charla ente Timón, Pumba y Simba sobre qué son las estrellas, separada de la depresión de Simba y descubrimiento de Rafiki de que Simba está vivo en Kings of the Past; la discusión entre Simba y Nala, además del momento en que Rakiki encuentra Simba, separados de la parte en que Rafiki abre los ojos a Simba con frases como "el vive en ti" y "recuerda quién eres" de Remember Who You Are; aparte de separar el inicio de los créditos finales del resto de la pista de The Rightful King. Y dado que la edición del disco prescinde en muchos casos del gap de silencio habitual entre pistas, resultando una audición en muchas partes prácticamente continua a pesar de los cambios de pista, podría haberse mejorado siendo escrupulosos con la división de pistas y no escatimar en la cantidad de las mismas para concatenar varias de ellas en una sola. Según esto, por lo menos cuatro pistas más podrían haberse añadido de haber seguido este consejo. Y es que, para el aficionado de la música de cine, la escucha de la música es importante, pero también lo es la lectura de los títulos de las pistas, que le ubican con precisión en el momento concreto de la película que se está escuchando. Y cuantas más pistas haya, más precisa y placentera resultará la escucha.

Sobre el arte del álbum, está creado por la española Lorelay Bové, como línea común de The Legacy Collection para todos sus lanzamientos, lo que le da a la edición un aspecto diferente y casi señorial, lo que sorprende y agrada a partes iguales. Y es que prescindir del arte tipo que hubiera supuesto incluir el típico fotograma a modo de portada ha resultado ser una buena elección. El resto del contenido del libreto se reduce a la inclusión de las letras de las canciones (algo muy valorable, especialmente con Disney, y que toda banda sonora con canción original creada expresamente para la película siempre debería incluir) y de algunos bocetos del proceso de dibujo de los artistas de Disney durante la creación de los personajes animados de la película. También escueto, pero que añade una nota de color al álbum y un oxigenante aspecto fuera de lo estrictamente musical.

Respecto al empaquetado, aunque bueno y bonito tiene la pega de que es “abierto”, lo que redundará en la entrada de polvo. Una caja cerrada no tiene por qué ser más fea y sí más segura. En cualquier caso, solo por la inclusión de todo el score de Zimmer esta edición contentará de sobra a todo fan de la música de El Rey León.

THE LION KING (1994)
Total Time: 46:27
  1. Circle of Life (3:58)
    Performed by Carmen Twillie and Lebo M
  2. I Just Can't Wait to Be King (2:49)
    Performed by Jason Weaver, Rowan Atkinson, and Laura Williams
  3. Be Prepared (3:38)
    Performed by Jeremy Irons
  4. Hakuna Matata (3:31)
    Performed by Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella
  5. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (2:56)
    Performed by Joseph Williams and Sally Dworsky
  6. This Land (2:53)
  1. ...To Die For (4:16)
  2. Under the Stars (3:43)
  3. King of Pride Rock (5:57)
  4. Circle of Life (4:50)
    Performed by Elton John
  5. I Just Can't Wait to Be King (3:35)
    Performed by Elton John
  6. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (End Title) (3:59)
    Performed by Elton John

* The international version included one extra track from Hans Zimmer's score: "Hyenas (4:08)".

THE LION KING: Special Edition (2003)
Total Time: 52:08
  1. Circle of Life (3:58)
    Performed by Carmen Twillie and Lebo M
  2. I Just Can't Wait to Be King (2:49)
    Performed by Jason Weaver, Rowan Atkinson, and Laura Williams
  3. Be Prepared (3:38)
    Performed by Jeremy Irons
  4. Hakuna Matata (3:31)
    Performed by Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella
  5. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (2:56)
    Performed by Joseph Williams and Sally Dworsky
  6. The Morning Report (1:34)
    Performed by James Earl Jones, Jeff Bennett and Evan Saucedo
  7. This Land (2:53)
  1. ...To Die For (4:16)
  2. Under the Stars (3:43)
  3. King of Pride Rock (5:57)
  4. Circle of Life (4:50)
    Performed by Elton John
  5. I Just Can't Wait to Be King (3:35)
    Performed by Elton John
  6. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (End Title) (3:59)
    Performed by Elton John
  7. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (Remix) (4:08)
    Performed by Elton John
THE LION KING: The Legacy Collection (2014)
Total Time: 121:05
DISC 1 (73:36) DISC 2 (47:29)
  1. Circle of Life / Nants’ Ingonyama (3:59)
    Performed by Carmen Twillie
    African Vocals Performed by Lebo M
  2. Didn’t Your Mother Tell You Not to Play With Your Food (2:07)
  3. We Are All Connected (3:01)
  4. Hyenas in the Pride Land (3:50)
  5. I Just Can't Wait to Be King (2:51)
    Performed by Jason Weaver with Rowan Atkinson and Laura Williams
  6. Elephant Graveyard (4:48)
  7. I Was Just Trying to Be Brave (2:15)
  8. Be Prepared (3:39)
    Performed by Jeremy Irons with Whoopi Goldberg, Cheech Marin and Jim Cummings
  9. Simba, It’s to Die For (0:48)
  10. Stampede (3:21)
  11. Mufasa Dies (3:27)
  12. If You Ever Come Back We’ll Kill You (1:38)
  13. Bowling for Buzzards (0:29)
  14. Hakuna Matata (4:07)
    Performed by Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella with Jason Weaver and Joseph Williams
  15. We Gotta Bone to Pick With You (1:08)
  16. Kings of the Past (2:47)
  17. Nala, Is It Really You? (4:11)
  18. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (2:52)
    Performed by Joseph Williams and Sally Dworsky with Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella and Kristle Edwards
  19. Remember Who You Are (7:48)
  20. This Is My Home (2:45)
  21. The Rightful King (11:45)
  1. The Morning Report (1:36)
    Performed by James Earl Jones, Jeff Bennett and Evan Saucedo
  2. Warthog Rhapsody (3:05)
    Performed by Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella
  3. We Are All Connected (Score Demo) (3:04)
  4. I Was Just Trying to Be Brave (Score Demo) (2:16)
  5. Stampede (Score Demo) (3:22)
  6. Mufasa Dies (Score Demo) (3:26)
  7. This Is My Home (Score Demo) (2:28)
  8. The Rightful King (Score Demo) (11:42)
  9. Circle of Life Instrumental Demo (4:02)
  10. Circle of Life (4:51)
    Performed by Elton John
  11. I Just Can’t Wait to Be King (3:36)
    Performed by Elton John
  12. Can You Feel the Love Tonight (End Title) (4:01)
    Performed by Elton John

Search Film Score...