COMPLETE SCORE
TITANINC Music from the Motion Picture (1997)

TITANIC

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

1997
15
72:22
Sony Classical

BACK TO TITANIC Music from the Motion Picture (1998)

BACK TO TITANIC

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

1998
13
79:00
Sony Classical

TITANIC Soundtrack: Anniversary Edition (2012)

TITANIC: Anniversary Edition

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

2012
30 (2 discs)
130:02
Sony Masterworks

TITANIC Soundtrack: Collector's Anniversary Edition (2012)

TITANIC: Collector's Anniversary Edition

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

2012
56 (4 discs)
249:50
Sony Masterworks

TITANIC Soundtrack: 20th Anniversary Edition (2017)

TITANIC: 20th Anniversary Edition

  • Release date:
  • Tracks:
  • Lenght time:
  • Label:

2017
68 (4 discs)
262:50
La-La Land Records

REVIEW

Titanic (ENGLISH)

Titanic (James Horner). James Horner's score for Titanic is an experiment that, unlike the transatlantic, it achieved to arrive to port. And it is that, faced with the idea of running away from a typical classical orchestral score, Horner mixes voices, synthesizers and orchestra to equal parts, creating a sound that can be difficultly catalogued, almost unique in its kind. It is difficult to know if it is the best score of the composer, but it can be the better one that combines with the action of the image. If we had to choose a movie in which its music fits to the perfection with the image, undoubtedly this one would be Titanic. And the fact of composing a timeless score, not typically at all and that fits so well, gives a bonus of merit to the composer. And only it is necessary to see the critiques and the sales (though these are very influenced by the original song My Heart Will Go On) to see the support to this merit.

After the release of Titanic: Music from the Motion Picture (1997), Back To Titanic (1998) was released, an album with lights and shadows, but that certainly was adding interesting content to the original edition released the previous year. Back to Titanic was bringing together a balanced mixing among diegetic music directly featured in the film (An Irish Party in Third Class, Alexander's Ragtime Band, Nearer My God to Thee, Come Josephine, in My Flying Machine), with pieces expressly created for this second edition (Titanic Suite, A Shore Never Reached, Epilogue - The Deep and Timeless Sea), together with other traditional pieces (Jack Dawson's Luck, Lament) and pieces, at least, of James Horner's original score (The Portrait, A Building Panic). My Heart Will Go On version with parts of the dialog from the film represent a peculiarity inside the context of the album, very usual, certainly, in the second editions of soundtracks as this one, since it happened, for example, in the second albums of Braveheart and Gladiator, become infested with dialogs of the movie on the music tracks.

For the followers of Titanic and James Horner’s music, only The Portrait and A Building Panic are pieces created by the composer expressly for the film. Though both tracks might be considered important inside the context of the story, The Portrait only appears partly in the portrait scene, whereas A Building Panic is one of the tracks that, together with The Sinking and Death of Titanic, shows the content of action that Horner composed for the movie, probably the breaking inside the general tone of the score and, undoubtedly, one of the most interesting. Titanic Suite, A Shore Never Reached, Epilogue - The Deep and Timeless Sea represents an interesting extension of the Horner's score but that, in the general context of this album, they represent a little contribution. If Back to Titanic was contributing more music created by Horner for the film, these tracks would be a perfect complement. And it is that, in spite of multiple music sources that exist in the movie -the score, the songs featured in the film-, the most important part of the album always should be the music of the composer, which, for extension and importance in the story, always is major with respect to the rest of music present in the film. In case of Back to Titanic, with only two tracks of Horner's original score, these three tracks, though they include part of the themes of the original score of the movie, it makes an insufficient contribution of the music of the composer to this album.

In 2012, Sony Classical re-edited the two original albums and added other two, coinciding with the re-release of Titanic movie in cinemas in 3D version, the 15th anniversary of the movie and 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. The Anniversary Edition has 2 discs (including the original 1997 album and other one with music featured by I Salonisti) and another Collector’s Anniversary Edition has four discs. Beyond the coincidence of dates and the re-release of the movie, the 2012 extended soundtrack is the continuation of the sin that began with Back to Titanic, adding content that does not appear in the movie. Gentlemen, It Has Been to Privilege Playing with You Tonight is the second disc of this edition and includes the themes recorded by I Salonisti for the movie in order to contribute the authentic source music of the film. It might be considered to be an album of "unreleased tracks", though they would be tracks of diegetic music instead of tracks of James Horner's score, probably more valued these for the fan of the film music and of James Horner's music. The fourth disc, Popular Music from the Titanic Era, contributes with music of the 1900s, providing the context of the epoch in which the drama represented in the movie is developed, but with the lack of dramatic value that the music used in the movie has. In the 2012 edition, the notes on I Salonisti's contracting and on certain aspects of the epoch of the sinking turn out to be more interesting than the proper music of both extra discs. Nonetheless, only a few movies can allow the luxury of doing a reissue of its soundtrack 15 years after the premiere in cinemas and do it in a format as ambitious as to fill four discs. And it seems that, at least, there are two requirements that justify the power to do this reissue: that the movie had been a public's great success and that the soundtrack also it had been. Titanic fulfills both conditions, probably as no other movie. In spite of it, it's a shame that the ambition of presenting the reissue of the Titanic’s soundtrack in such a wide format moves away from the intention that this one should have: to present the music of the movie in its entirety, with better sound quality, in chronological order, with alternate versions not used in the final version of the film and extensive notes on the tracks and the process of composition and recording. Apart from all the information relative to the soundtrack that 15 years later one can tell with extent and perspective.

In summary, Back to Titanic is a good complement of the original 1997 album, though it might have been better having added more of the "lost" content created by Horner. While, the 2012 edition will difficultly hook the buyer who was acquiring both previous discs 15 years before, basically because the added content is not present in the footage of the movie or it's not a James Horner's composition. One thing the editor forgets is that the success of the original soundtrack is based on Horner's music and, specially, on My Heart Will Go On theme song, featured by Celine Dion. There is not relationship between the music of the beginning of the 20th century with the Horner's score and song, which existence reason is for telling a fictitious love story in the context of the drama of the sinking of the transatlantic under James Cameron's perspective. For this reason, it seems to be erroneous enough to sell music of beginning of century to a public been interested in Horner's music. Even this way, all this music is commercialized under the "Titanic" and "Music composed and conducted by James Horner" labels, surely be more successful of the one that really was deserving after a critical analysis of the edition content. The record label will know it perfectly.

The real aim of sales looks like the new fan that sees Titanic in 3D for the first time, and that, on having been going to acquire the soundtrack, buys the four disc version at a major price. The intention of doing easy money on the part of the record label seems to be evident if we analyze that the new content added with regard to the original editions of 1997 and 1998 is musical already recorded by I Salonisti and themes from more than 100 years ago. And if the person entrusted to make the 2012 soundtrack compilation liked the film soundtracks, it is easy to understand that him/her were crying a lot on having received the order of re-editing the Titanic's soundtrack and turn forced, on order of the people who gives the orders, to putting all this padding material without doing not even the attempt of recovering the music that really would have to occupy these lines: the Horner's score. A pity for the lost opportunity.

In 2017 a compilation of 4 discs is published commemorating the 20th anniversary of the film. This compilation begins badly: one of the greatest hopes of the music fan of Titanic was the publication of the Main Title, among other themes. Finally, this compilation included it, but the non-existent theme of the Logo is stuck on the same track, preceding the Main Title and spoiling the sound experience without remedy. One of the biggest blunders in the discography of La-La Land Records. With this, the attempt to emulate the sensation that the beginning of the film gave us in the cinema 20 years ago has been attenuated. If at least the Logo had been separated on a separate track, the fan could begin the audition with Sissel's voice from the first second simply by changing the track. This and other unexplained alterations make this compilation a dream come true that does not shine, or that they have not let it shine, because it is evident that the compilation, rather than failures, has bad decisions. And for a film of the importance and deeply touch of Titanic in the social, in the film and the musical aspects, is a serious sin. The work of the label, often outstanding, has been tested with a heavyweight, perhaps the heaviest with which they have had to deal with until this edition. The publication of the soundtrack of Titanic carries the most demanding expectations from the soundtrack fan and La-La Land has remained relatively far from excellence. And that distance has been increased for two reasons: the first, for not being faithful to the La-La Land style that in certain aspects has disappeared; and another, for committing such obvious faults that it is annoying not to have corrected them in time before their evidence. Although perhaps not all these bad decisions are attributable to La-La Land, at least the non-inclusion of My Heart Will Go On will be placed in the drawer of the problems about the rights of the song.

My Drawing / Relics & Treasures really makes your hair stand on end. That synthetic sound instantly brings memory back to that moment in a 1997/98 movie theater when Horner's magic musicalized the overwhelming staging of James Cameron. It is not that the track is the best melody ever heard, nor the scene one of the best remembered, no. It is the discovery that the synthetic sound, almost seedy, that James Horner used for the soundtrack has been linked to the cinematic experience that this film provided us, and it is really incredible to see how that association awakens 20 years later in our mind to an instantaneous speed. An effect that has been latent but hidden. Listening for the first time to this track activates the spring, which causes memories and chills to return to travel the body again 20 years later.

In addition to the inclusion of Logo, other failures in the making of the track list continue to ballast this edition: To the Keldysh / Rose Revealed are two moments evidently distanced in the footage of the film that, however, appear together in the same track, unfortunately something usual in soundtrack albums. The same goes for First Sighting / Rose's Suicide Attempt and The Promenade / Butterfly Comb. It would have been better to separate the different parts into separate tracks to oxygenate the transition between them, instead of inventing a nonexistent temporary union. We like clean themes, to easily locate each moment, and mixes of themes distort listening.

Rose, the exaltation of memory and the genius of James Horner, is music, evocation and film at its best, and continues to surprise us 20 years after its first listen. Continuing with the tracks The Portrait appears, and waiting for the famous theme of Celine Dion versioned by the own hands of James Horner, we find a pseudo theme halfway between Rose and The Portrait (the piano version that was already included in Back to Titanic (1998)). Due that La-La Land does not comment the tracks, we do not know what is this or why it is located in a place as emblematic as the moment in which Jack immortalized Rose with pencil and paper. A track that becomes so obvious an intrusive that annoys for the lack of respect that implies usurping the site of the theme that should be in this place (I mean, the Horner's piano solo).

The rest of the themes added with respect to those already known make up the compilation that we have been waiting for from Back to Titanic and that was reluctant to arrive, and Lovejoy Chases Jack and Rose, Lovemaking... are an example of singular themes that are hardly negligible when making a musical compilation in the form of an album, but two of those that had to do without in previous editions. From our point of view, something really painful. And is that, beyond the sympathy of each one for a movie, some of them have a vertically directed plot that usually carries a special soundtrack attached. In this the composer's judgement, his affinity with the story and his personal creative moment in the time of the composition greatly influence. But the evolution of the story is also essential, and soundtracks such as Star Wars (1977), which go from one place to another marking the passage track after track without boredom or repeat, make the memory of the film an experience of extreme pleasure. With Titanic the same thing happens, and the singularity and uniqueness of almost all its tracks make that this compilation for the 20th anniversary at least allow us to travel from start to finish almost unhindered. Almost. Because, as has been mentioned before, tracks like Logo and The Portrait (disc 1, track 13) are still stones placed incomprehensibly in that path with which it is inevitable to stumble.

Disc 2 of the compilation begins with A Building Panic (Film version) and Trapped on "D" Deck, two clear examples of what the final aspect of a marked action track is, practically a hodgepodge of themes, sub-themes and effects united almost with a simple cut-paste, and much less directional than the tracks that are often recomposed to include in the commercial album. But that's the essence, and that's why we like them.

And we come to another critical track also long awaited: the resolution of A Promise Kept. The track was already included in the original album, but only the first minute and a half is used in the film. After this first part, the film version reuses Sissel's voice in the same way as it appears in the Main Title, closing in some way the circle that began to be drawn at the beginning of the film, and then, giving way to the theme of Rose played by flutes, while she pronounces her promise and releases Jack's hand, who sinks forever into the depths of the ocean. This second part of the sequence appears in A Promise Kept (alternate) (disc 3, track 16). To our surprise, there is no track that unifies the two versions of A Promise Kept and that reflects the actual version used in the film (the first and a half minutes of A Promise Kept and the entire A Promise Kept (alternate)). For all this, it would have been more appropriate to name as alternate to track 7 of disc 2 and exchange its position with A Promise Kept (alternate) on disc 3. A pity and a catastrophic failure for the order of tracks that prevents the listener taste the most intense instant of the whole movie with all its strength. This transition from the Sissel's voices to the flutes (while Rose and Jack are separated forever) only occurs to us to describe it as a masterful sequence of the film history. Or maybe it's just an extremely sad moment exalted to infinity by Horner's music of that particular moment, although helped no doubt by the almost 3 hours of music with which Horner prepared us subtly and psychologically for what was to come.

Another small but important detail that is missing is the final figure that makes the flute to join the last track of music with the final credits, the same 7 notes with which the Rose theme ends, repositioned over the words "Written and Directed by James Cameron", that dismiss the score with Irish flavor and give way to the voice of Celine Dion over My Heart Will Go On.

On discs 1 and 2 under the name of SCORE PRESENTATION these events appear: most of the tracks 2 1/2 Miles Down and A Promise Kept do not appear in the film; the version of The Portrait we do not know where it came from and it leaves us face of "but what the f*** is this!?"; while Logo, Rose Frees Jack, Murdoch's Suicide, An Ocean of Memories and Post were not used in the final editing, or at least we do not know how to locate them. Meanwhile, in the disc 3 of ADDITIONAL MUSIC AND ALTERNATES they lodge, inexplicably, Piano Theme-The Portrait and A Promise Kept (alternate), both being the versions that really appear in the film (or versions that are closer to them). Certainly, the musical montage of Titanic reuses parts of some tracks outside the main moment for which they were composed, such as Rose or Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave. And being a repetition, you can avoid repositioning them in the album. But then to complete a SCORE PRESENTATION of almost 2 hours with so many anomalies is grotesque, especially when it comes to the third edition of the soundtrack (without considering the albums of 2012 that did not bring any new Horner content).

The summary of the first 3 discs is not great: tracks that do not appear in the film are placed on the first 2 discs (in the SCORE PRESENTATION); tracks that do appear in the film are placed on disc 3 along with the extras and alternate versions; and all without clear identification by La-La Land. In summary: disorder and disinformation.

The first lesson that this compilation has to make clear is this: the logos, separately. Except in the few cases that merge with the score, it does not make sense to include them in a special edition and adhere to the following track as if pretending to dilute them. About the 2 serious errors of the compilation: the first one, the list of tracks refuses to reveal two details: which of them are "previously unreleased" and which of them are not used totally or partially in the final montage ("not used in film "), that there are many, something inconceivable in the world of the expanded editions and in the own historic of the editions of the La-La Land label. Why that information is not given? Is there something to hide? It gives the feeling that the absence of this information is deliberate, and that it hides by shame to be revealed.

The second fault: in a vertical plot film without loitering to waste time and express repetitive musical passages (as could happen in movies with long and repetitive fight scenes), the Titanic booklet should include a detailed track-by-track analysis. A content that we believe logical to include, even further if possible when it is a technique to which La-La Land has appealed on numerous occasions. These two deficiencies (absence of the identification "previously unreleased" and "not used in film" + absence of track analysis) makes us suspect the content of the edition. It is true that the content of the discs 1 and 2 is included as "SCORE PRESENTATION", from which it could be deduced that this is the version of the soundtrack of La-La Land (with clutter and clues not used), not the real version of the film. Given the versions that the composer had to reconfigure before the changes in the editing of the film, it could be thought that there is a high number of versions of some of the tracks, and here we have been presented with one of them, the one that more resembles the final assembly, perhaps. Even so, we ask ourselves fervently why the imprecision has become protagonist in a compilation that should be the culmination of the work of La-La Land. Despite the benefits of including the extensive musical footage of the compilation, the final taste is that La-La Land has lowered the bar at the worst moment.

The absence of My Heart Will Go On, the song performed by Celine Dion that really boosted sales of the original album to become the bestselling instrumental soundtrack in history, is almost fraudulent. While La-La Land was concerned to warn that the song would not be included in the compilation, its absence is catastrophic. Few composers like James Horner can boast of creating songs from the score so well fused with it, in a way so bright and obvious. And this is an even more special case, when the version present in the original soundtrack extended the score towards the end of the credits, making its functionality more evident as a movie-score, rather than as an end-credits-song. This functionality as a score also differentiated it from the more pop, lighter and shorter version published on Celine Dion's own albums. And it is so great because no one demanded it from Horner, he simply created it as an extensive compositional element of the score, free of commercial demands, so that it would remain easily remembered despite the passage of time. Undoubtedly, the moment in which the voice of Dion appeared over the end credits turned it into a surprise so unexpected as perfect to pick up the sorrows and cries of the cinema and to take them with great care towards the outside of the room. Wonderful.

The fourth disc formed by diegetic music performed within the film itself rounds out the widest edition. Not forgetting that there is a string quartet on the boat that entertains the story almost constantly, in addition to the passengers of third class who also play their music, Titanic has a very high amount of music performed within the film, which gives to fill a disc only with it. And in this 2017 edition, it is a musical content that you want to listen to introduce you even more in the time and in the story told in the film, unlike in the editions of 2012, where all this music seemed more a burden for the transatlantic itself given the nonexistence of Horner's new music, the true reason for the album's publication. All in all, the compilation of 2017 differs from the previous editions in the great amount of music by James Horner that it includes composed for the film. An Ocean of Memories or Hymn to the Sea are not found in the film's montage, but they are Horner's work for the film and tremendously evocative pieces.

About the booklet, despite missing a detailed report of each track, it has a content that, although abundant and interesting, ends up being insufficient. The reader and fan of Horner and Titanic needed even more, that is the effect produced by this film. Perhaps the less graceful feature of the 2017 edition is the art of the cover and the track list, excessively serene and very little showy compared to the original editions of Titanic (1997) and Back to Titanic (1998).

In summary, the 20th anniversary edition falls short, both in musical montage and in information, despite having 4 discs and a large booklet. A paradox difficult to understand with the figures in hand, but is that the more than 3 hours of footage of Titanic give for much more.

Titanic (ESPAÑOL)

Titanic (James Horner). La partitura de James Horner para Titanic es un experimento en sí que, al contrario que el transatlántico, sí que llegó a buen puerto. Y es que, ante la idea de huir de un score típico orquestal clásico, Horner mezcla voces, sintetizadores y orquesta a partes iguales, creando un tono general difícilmente catalogable, casi único en su especie. Es difícil saber si es la mejor partitura del compositor, pero sí puede ser la que mejor combina con la acción de la imagen. Si tuviéramos que elegir una película en la que su música encaja a la perfección con la imagen, sin duda alguna esa sería Titanic. Y el hecho de componer un score atemporal, nada típico y que encaja tan bien, le da al compositor un plus de mérito. Y solo hay que ver las críticas y las ventas (si bien éstas muy influenciadas por la canción original My Heart Will Go On) para ver el respaldo a ese mérito.

Tras la edición de Titanic: Music from the Motion Picture (1997) se publicó Back To Titanic (1998), un álbum con claroscuros pero que ciertamente añadía contenido interesante a la edición original editada el año anterior. Dicho álbum conjugaba una equilibrada mezcla entre música diegética interpretada directamente en el film (An Irish Party in Third Class, Alexander's Ragtime Band, Nearer My God to Thee, Come Josephine, in My Flying Machine), con piezas expresamente creadas para esta segunda edición (Titanic Suite, A Shore Never Reached, Epilogue - The Deep and Timeless Sea), junto con otras piezas tradicionales (Jack Dawson's Luck, Lament) y piezas, al fin, del score original de James Horner (The Portrait, A Building Panic). La versión de My Heart Will Go On con partes del diálogo del film no representa más que una peculiaridad dentro del contexto del álbum, muy habitual por cierto en segundas ediciones de bandas sonoras como ésta, como sucedió, por ejemplo, en los segundos álbumes de Braveheart y Gladiator, plagados de diálogos de la película sobre las pistas de música.

Para los seguidores de Horner y de la película en sí, tan solo The Portrait y A Building Panic aportan más contenido creado por el compositor expresamente para el film. Si bien ambas pistas podrían considerarse importantes dentro del contexto de la historia, The Portrait sólo aparece en parte en la escena del retrato, mientras que A Building Panic es una de las pistas que, junto con The Sinking y Death of Titanic, muestra el contenido de acción que Horner compuso para la película, quizás la parte más rompedora dentro del tono general del score y, sin duda, una de las más interesantes. Titanic Suite, A Shore Never Reached, Epilogue - The Deep and Timeless Sea representan una extensión del score de Horner interesante pero que, en el contexto general de este álbum, saben a poco. Si Back to Titanic aportara más música creada por Horner para el film, estas pistas serían un complemento perfecto. Y es que, a pesar de existir múltiples fuentes de música dentro de la película –el score, las canciones interpretadas en el film-, el grueso del álbum siempre debería ser la música del compositor, que por extensión e importancia en la narración, siempre es mayor que el resto de músicas presentes en la película. En el caso de Back to Titanic, con tan solo dos pistas del score original de Horner, estas tres pistas, aunque incluyen parte de la temática del score original de la película, hacen insuficiente el contenido que la música del compositor aporta a dicho álbum.

En 2012, y aprovechando el 15º aniversario de la película y el 100º aniversario del hundimiento del Titanic, Sony Classical reeditó los dos álbumes originales y añadió otros dos más, aprovechando la reposición de cines de Titanic en versión 3D. Se comercializó una versión Aniversario de 2 discos (que incluía el disco original de 1997 y otro con contenido interpretado por I Salonisti) y otra versión Aniversario para Coleccionistas (con cuatro discos). Más allá de la cuadratura de fechas y de la reposición de la película, la banda sonora ampliada de 2012 es la continuación del pecado que se inició con Back to Titanic, añadiendo contenido que no aparece en la película. Gentlemen, It Has Been a Privilege Playing with You Tonight es el tercer disco de la edición de 2012 e incluye los temas grabados por I Salonisti para la película con el fin de aportar el auténtico sonido real de la música de la época. Podría considerarse como un álbum de "unreleased tracks”, si bien serían pistas de música diegética en lugar de pistas del score de James Horner, quizás más valoradas éstas por el aficionado a la música de cine y a la música de James Horner. El cuarto disco, Popular Music from the Titanic Era, aporta música de los años 1900, contextualizando la época en la que se desarrolla el drama representado en la película, pero sin añadir ese valor dramático que la música presente en la película sí tiene. De la edición de 2012, resultan casi más interesantes las notas sobre la contratación de I Salonisti y sobre ciertos aspectos de la época del hundimiento, que la propia música de los dos discos extra. A pesar de todo, pocas películas pueden permitirse el lujo de hacer una reedición de su banda sonora 15 años después del estreno en cines y hacerlo en un formato tan ambicioso como para llenar cuatro discos. Y parece que, al menos, hay dos requisitos que justifiquen el poder hacer esta reedición: que la película hubiese sido un gran éxito de público y que la banda sonora también lo hubiera sido. Titanic cumple ambas condiciones, quizás como ninguna otra película. A pesar de ello, es una pena que la ambición de presentar la reedición de la banda sonora de Titanic en un formato tan amplio se aleje del propósito que ésta debería tener: presentar la música de la película en su totalidad, con mejor calidad de sonido, en orden cronológico, con versiones alternativas no utilizadas en la versión final del film y comentarios extensos sobre las pistas y el proceso de composición y grabación. Aparte de toda la información relativa a la banda sonora que 15 años después puede contarse con amplitud y perspectiva.

En resumen, Back to Titanic es un buen complemento del álbum original de 1997, aunque podría haber sido mejor habiendo añadido más del contenido "perdido" creado por Horner. Mientras, la edición de 2012 difícilmente enganchará al comprador que adquiriera los dos discos anteriores 15 años antes, básicamente porque el contenido añadido no está presente en el metraje de la película o no es composición de James Horner. Se le olvida al editor que el éxito de la banda sonora original está fundamentado en la música de Horner y, especialmente, en el tema My Heart Will Go On, interpretado por Celine Dion. Nada tiene que ver la música de principios del siglo XX con el score y la canción de Horner, cuya razón de ser es la de contar una historia de amor ficticia en el contexto del drama del hundimiento del transatlántico bajo la perspectiva de James Cameron. Por tanto, parece bastante erróneo vender música de principios de siglo a un público interesado en la música de Horner. Aun así, como toda esta música se comercializa bajo las etiquetas "Titanic" y "Music composed and conducted by James Horner", seguramente tenga más éxito del que realmente mereciera tras un análisis crítico del contenido. La discográfica lo sabrá perfectamente. El objetivo real de ventas parece el nuevo aficionado que ve Titanic en 3D por primera vez, y que, al ir a adquirir la banda sonora, se le vende una versión de cuatro discos a un precio mayor. La intención de hacer dinero fácil por parte de la discográfica parece evidente si analizamos que el contenido nuevo añadido respecto a las ediciones originales de 1997 y 1998 es música ya grabada por I Salonisti y temas de hace más de 100 años. Y si a la persona encargada de hacer la compilación de 2012 le gustaran las bandas sonoras, entenderíamos perfectamente que se le cayeran los lagrimones al recibir el encargo de reeditar la banda sonora de Titanic y verse obligado, por orden de arriba, a meter todo este material de relleno sin hacer ni el intento de recuperar la música que verdaderamente tendría que ocupar estas líneas: la de Horner. Una lástima por la ocasión perdida.

En 2017 se publica una compilación de 4 discos conmemorando el 20º aniversario de la película. Dicha compilación empieza mal: una de las mayores esperanzas del aficionado a la música de Titanic era la de la publicación del Main Title, entre otros temas. Por fin, esta compilación lo incluyó, pero el inexistente tema del Logo es adherido en la misma pista, precediendo al Main Title y estropeando la experiencia sonora sin remedio. Una de las mayores torpezas de la discografía de La-La Land Records. Con ello, el intento de emulación de la sensación que el inicio de la película nos proporcionó en la sala de cine 20 años atrás ha quedado atenuado. Si al menos el Logo se hubiera separado en una pista aparte, el aficionado podría comenzar la audición con la voz de Sissel desde el primer segundo simplemente cambiando de pista. Ésta y otras inexplicables alteraciones hacen de esta compilación un sueño hecho realidad que no brilla, o que no le han dejado brillar, porque es evidente que la compilación, más que fallos, tiene malas decisiones. Y para una película del calado e importancia de Titanic, en lo social, en lo cinematográfico y en lo musical, es un pecado grave. El trabajo de la discográfica, a menudo sobresaliente, se ha puesto a prueba con un peso pesado, quizás el más pesado con el que ha tenido que lidiar hasta esta edición. El publicar la banda sonora de Titanic conlleva las más exigentes expectativas desde el lado del aficionado y La-La Land se ha quedado relativamente lejos de la excelencia. Y esa distancia se ha acrecentado por dos motivos: el primero, por no ser fieles al estilo de La-La Land que en ciertos aspectos ha desaparecido; y otro, por cometer fallos tan obvios que da rabia no haberlos subsanado a tiempo ante su evidencia. Aunque quizás no todas estas malas decisiones sean achacables a La-La Land, al menos la no inclusión de My Heart Will Go On la colocaremos en el cajón de los problemas sobre los derechos de la canción.

My Drawing / Relics & Treasures pone realmente los pelos de punta. Ese sonido sintético retrotrae la memoria instantáneamente a ese momento en una sala de cine de 1997/98 cuando la magia de Horner musicalizaba la abrumadora puesta en escena de James Cameron. No es que la pista sea la mejor melodía jamás escuchada, ni la escena una de las mejor recordadas, no. Es el descubrimiento de que ese sonido sintético, casi cutre, que James Horner utilizó para la banda sonora ha quedado ligado a la experiencia cinematográfica que nos proporcionó esta película, y es realmente increíble comprobar cómo esa asociación despierta 20 años más tarde en nuestra mente a una velocidad instantánea. Un efecto que ha estado latente pero escondido. La escucha por primera vez de esta pista activa el resorte, el cual hace que los recuerdos y escalofríos regresen para recorrer el cuerpo de nuevo 20 años después.

Además de la inclusión de Logo, otros fallos en la confección del listado de pistas siguen lastrando esta edición: To the Keldysh / Rose Revealed son dos momentos evidentemente distanciados en el metraje de la película que, sin embargo, aparecen juntos en una misma pista, desgraciadamente algo habitual en álbumes de bandas sonoras. Lo mismo sucede con First Sighting / Rose's Suicide Attempt, The Promenade / Butterfly Comb. Mejor hubiera sido separar las distintas partes en pistas separadas para oxigenar la transición entre ellas, en lugar de inventar una inexistente unión temporal. Nos gustan los temas limpios, para poder localizar fácilmente cada momento, y las mezclas de temas desvirtúan la escucha.

Rose, la exaltación del recuerdo y de la genialidad de James Horner, es música, evocación y cine en su máxima expresión, y sigue sobrecogiéndonos 20 años después de su primera escucha. Continuando con las pistas aparece The Portrait, y esperando el famoso tema de Celine Dion versionado por las propias manos de James Horner, nos encontramos un pseudotema a mitad de camino entre Rose y The Portrait (la versión piano que ya se incluyó en Back to Titanic (1998)). Dado que La-La Land no comenta las pistas, no sabemos qué es esto ni porqué está situado en un lugar del metraje tan emblemático como el momento en el que Jack inmortaliza a Rose con lápiz y papel. Una pista que se convierte en un intruso tan evidente que molesta por la falta de respeto que supone el usurpar el sitio del tema que debería estar en su lugar (ósea, el piano solo de Horner).

El resto de temas añadidos respecto a los ya conocidos conforman la compilación que llevamos esperando desde Back to Titanic y que se resistía a llegar, y Lovejoy Chases Jack and Rose, Lovemaking… son un ejemplo de temas singulares difícilmente despreciables a la hora de hacer una compilación musical en forma de álbum, pero de los que hubo que prescindir en ediciones anteriores. Bajo nuestro punto de vista, algo realmente doloroso. Y es que, más allá de la simpatía de cada uno por una película, algunas de ellas tienen una trama dirigida verticalmente que suele llevar adosada una banda sonora especial. En ello influye mucho el tino del compositor, su afinidad con la historia y su momento creativo personal en el tiempo de la composición. Pero el devenir de la historia también es esencial, y bandas sonoras como La Guerra de las Galaxias (1977), que van de un lado a otro marcando el paso pista tras pista sin aburrir ni repetirse, hacen del recuerdo de la película una experiencia de extremo placer. Con Titanic sucede lo mismo, y la singularidad y unicidad de casi todas sus pistas hacen que esta compilación por el 20º aniversario al menos nos permita viajar de principio a fin casi sin obstáculos. Casi. Porque, como se ha mencionado antes, pistas como Logo y The Portrait (disco 1, pista 13) siguen siendo piedras colocadas incomprensiblemente en ese camino con las que es inevitable tropezar.

El disco 2 de la compilación comienza con A Building Panic (Film version) y Trapped on "D" Deck, dos ejemplos claros de lo que realmente es el aspecto final de una pista de marcada acción, prácticamente un batiburrillo de temas, subtemas y efectos unidos casi con un simple corta-pega, y bastante menos direccionales que las pistas que muchas veces se recomponen para incluir en el álbum comercial. Pero esa es la esencia, y por ello nos gustan.

Y llegamos a otra pista crítica también largamente esperada: la resolución de A Promise Kept. La pista ya fue incluida en el álbum original, pero tan solo el primer minuto y medio es utilizado en el film. Tras esta primera parte, la versión del film reutiliza la voz de Sissel en la misma forma que aparece en el Main Title, cerrando de alguna manera el círculo que se empezó a trazar al inicio de la película, para, seguidamente, dar paso al tema de Rose interpretado por flautas, mientras ella pronuncia su promesa y suelta la mano de Jack, que se hunde para siempre en las profundidades del océano. Esta segunda parte de la secuencia aparece en A Promise Kept (alternate) (disco 3, pista 16). Para nuestra sorpresa, no hay una pista que unifique las dos versiones de A Promise Kept y que refleje la versión real utilizada en el film (el primer minuto y medio de A Promise Kept y la totalidad de A Promise Kept (alternate)). Por todo ello, realmente hubiera sido más oportuno nombrar como versión alternativa a la pista 7 del disco 2 e intercambiar su posición con A Promise Kept (alternate) en el disco 3. Una lástima y un fallo catastrófico para el orden de pistas que impide al oyente degustar el instante más intenso de toda la película con toda su fuerza. Dicha transición desde las voces de Sissel hasta las flautas (mientras Rose y Jack se separan para siempre) sólo se nos ocurre describirla como secuencia magistral de la historia del cine. O quizás simplemente es un instante extremadamente triste exaltado hasta el infinito por la música de Horner de ese momento concreto, aunque ayudado sin duda por las casi 3 horas anteriores de música con las que Horner nos preparó sutil y psicológicamente para lo que estaba por venir.

Otro pequeño pero importante detalle que se echa en falta es la figura final que hace la flauta para unir la última pista de música con los créditos finales, las mismas 7 notas con las que se despide el tema de Rose, recolocadas sobre el cartel "Written and Directed by James Cameron”, que despiden el score con sabor irlandés y dan paso a la voz de Celine Dion sobre My Heart Will Go On.

En los discos 1 y 2 bajo el nombre de SCORE PRESENTATION aparecen estos sucesos: la mayor parte de las pistas 2 1/2 Miles Down y A Promise Kept no sale en el film; la versión de The Portrait no sabemos de dónde salió y nos deja cara de "¿¡pero qué m***** es esto!?"; mientras que Logo, Rose Frees Jack, Murdoch's Suicide, An Ocean of Memories y Post no se utilizaron en el montaje final, o al menos no sabemos ubicarlas. Mientras, en el disco 3 de ADDITIONAL MUSIC AND ALTERNATES se alojan, inexplicablemente, Piano Theme—The Portrait y A Promise Kept (alternate), ambas siendo las versiones que realmente salen en el film (o versiones que más se aproximan a ellas). Ciertamente, el montaje musical de Titanic reutiliza partes de algunas pistas fuera del momento principal para el que fueron compuestas, como Rose o Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave. Y al ser una repetición, puede evitarse volver a ubicarlas en el álbum. Pero de ahí a completar una SCORE PRESENTATION de casi 2 horas de duración con tantas anomalías resulta grotesco, sobre todo cuando se trata ya de la tercera edición de la banda sonora (sin considerar los álbumes de 2012 que no aportaron contenido novedoso de Horner alguno).

El resumen de los 3 primeros discos es regular: pistas que no aparecen en el film están colocadas en los 2 primeros discos (en el SCORE PRESENTATION); pistas que sí aparecen en el film están colocadas en el disco 3 junto con los extras y las versiones alternativas; y todo ello sin una identificación clara por parte de La-La Land. En resumen: desorden y desinformación.

La primera lección que esta compilación ha de dejar clara es esta: los logos, por separado. Salvo en los contados casos que se fusionan con el score, no tiene sentido incluirlos en una edición especial y adherirlos a la siguiente pista como aparentando querer diluirlos. Sobre los 2 fallos graves de la compilación: el primero, el listado de pistas se resiste a revelar dos detalles: cuáles de ellas son "previously unreleased" y cuáles de ellas no son usadas total o parcialmente en el montaje final ("not used in film"), que hay muchas, algo inconcebible en el mundo de las ediciones expandidas y en el propio histórico de las ediciones del sello La-La Land. ¿Por qué no se da esa información? ¿Hay algo que esconder? Da la sensación de que la ausencia de esta información es deliberada, y que se esconde por vergüenza a ser revelada.

El segundo fallo: en una película de trama vertical sin merodeos que hagan perder el tiempo y expresar pasajes musicales repetitivos (como pudiera suceder en películas con largas y repetitivas escenas de lucha), el libreto de Titanic debería incluir un pormenorizado análisis pista por pista. Un contenido que creemos lógico incluir, más si cabe cuando es una técnica a la que La-La Land ha recurrido en numerosas ocasiones. Estas dos carencias (ausencia de la identificación "previously unreleased" y "not used in film" + ausencia de análisis de pistas) hace sospechar del contenido de la edición. Bien es cierto que el contenido de los discos 1 y 2 es incluido como "SCORE PRESENTATION”, de lo que se podría deducir que esta es la versión de la banda sonora de La-La Land (con desorden y pistas no usadas), no la versión real del film. Dadas las versiones que el compositor tuvo que reconfigurar ante los cambios en la edición de la película, pudiera pensarse que hay una elevada cantidad de versiones de algunas de las pistas, y aquí se nos ha presentado una de ellas, la que más se parece al montaje final, quizás. Aun así, nos preguntamos fervientemente por qué la imprecisión se ha hecho protagonista en una compilación que debería ser el culmen del trabajo de La-La Land. A pesar de las bondades de incluir el extenso metraje musical de la compilación, el sabor final es el de que La-La Land ha bajado el listón de exigencia en el peor momento.

La ausencia de My Heart Will Go On, el tema interpretado por Celine Dion que realmente impulsó las ventas del álbum original hasta convertirla en la banda sonora instrumental más vendida de la historia, es casi fraudulento. Si bien el La-La Land se preocupó de avisar de que el tema no estaría incluido en la compilación, su ausencia es catastrófica. Pocos compositores como James Horner pueden presumir de crear canciones a partir del score tan bien fusionados con él, de manera tan brillante y evidente. Y este es un caso aún más especial, cuando la versión presente en la banda sonora original extendía el score hacia el final de los créditos, haciendo más evidente su funcionalidad como score-de-cine, más que como canción-fin-de-créditos. Esta funcionalidad como score también la diferenciaba de la versión más pop, más ligera y más corta publicada en los álbumes propios de Celine Dion. Y es tan genial porque nadie se la exigió a Horner, simplemente la creó como elemento compositivo extensivo del score, libre de exigencias comerciales, para que permaneciera con facilidad en el recuerdo a pesar del paso del tiempo. Sin duda, el momento en el que la voz de Dion aparecía sobre los títulos de crédito la convirtió en una sorpresa tan inesperada como perfecta para recoger las penas y llantos de la sala de cine y llevarlos con sumo cuidado hacia el exterior de la sala. Maravilloso.

El cuarto disco formado por música diegética interpretada dentro de la propia película redondea la amplísima edición. Sin olvidar que en el barco hay un cuarteto de cuerda que ameniza la historia casi constantemente, además de los propios pasajeros de tercera clase que también interpretan su música, Titanic tiene una elevadísima cantidad de música interpretada dentro de la película, que da para llenar un disco sólo con ella. Y en esta edición de 2017 sí apetece escucharla para introducirnos más aún en la época y en la historia contada en la película, al contrario que en las ediciones de 2012, donde toda esta música parecía más un lastre para el propio transatlántico dada la inexistencia de nueva música de Horner, la verdadera razón de ser de la publicación del álbum. Con todo, la compilación de 2017 se diferencia de las ediciones anteriores en la gran cantidad de música de James Horner que incluye compuesta para el film. An Ocean of Memories o Hymn to the Sea no las encontramos en el montaje de la película, pero son trabajo de Horner para el film y piezas tremendamente evocadoras.

Sobre el libreto, a pesar de echar en falta un detallado informe de cada pista, tiene un contenido que, aunque abundante e interesante, termina sabiendo a poco. El lector y aficionado a Horner y a Titanic necesitaba aún más, ése es el efecto que produce esta película. Quizás el rasgo menos agraciado de la edición de 2017 es el arte de la portada y del listado de pistas, excesivamente sereno y muy poco vistoso comparado con las ediciones originales de Titanic (1997) y Back to Titanic (1998).

En resumen, la edición 20 aniversario se queda corta, tanto en música como en información, a pesar de tener 4 discos y un libreto grande. Una paradoja difícil de entender con las cifras en la mano, pero es que las más de 3 horas de metraje de Titanic dan para mucho más.

TRACK LISTINGS
TITANIC
1997
Total Time: 72:22
Label:
Sony Classical
  1. Never an Absolution (3:03)
  2. Distant Memories (2:24)
  3. Southampton (4:02)
  4. Rose (2:52)
  5. Leaving Port (3:26)
  6. "Take Her to Sea, Mr. Murdoch" (4:31)
  7. "Hard to Starboard" (6:52)
  8. Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave (3:57)
  9. The Sinking (5:05)
  10. Death of Titanic (8:26)
  11. A Promise Kept (6:03)
  12. A Life So Changed (2:13)
  13. An Ocean of Memories (7:58)
  14. My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme from 'Titanic') (performed by Celine Dion) (5:11)
  15. Hymn to the Sea (6:26)
BACK TO TITANIC
1998
Total Time: 79:00
Label:
Sony Classical
  1. Titanic Suite *† (19:05)
  2. An Irish Party in Third Class (performed by Gaelic Storm) (3:49)
  3. Alexander's Ragtime Band (performed by I Salonisti) (2:30)
  4. The Portrait (piano solo performed by James Horner) (4:43)
  5. Jack Dawson's Luck (5:38)
  6. A Building Panic (8:09)
  7. Nearer My God to Thee (performed by I Salonisti) (2:49)
  8. Come Josephine, in my Flying Machine (performed by Máire Brennan) (3:32)
  9. Lament (4:36)
  10. A Shore Never Reached * (4:27)
  11. My Heart Will Go On (with dialogue from the film) (performed by Celine Dion) (4:43)
  12. Nearer My God to Thee (performed by Eileen Ivers) (2:22)
  13. Epilogue - The Deep and Timeless Sea *† (12:37)
* Performed by The London Symphony Orchestra and
the Choristers of King's College, Cambridge
TITANIC: Anniversary Edition
2012
Total Time: 130:02
Label:
Sony Masterworks
    DISC 1: Titanic Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Remastered) (72:22)
    Music composed and Conducted by James Horner
  1. Never an Absolution (3:03)
  2. Distant Memories (2:24)
  3. Southampton (4:02)
  4. Rose (2:52)
  5. Leaving Port (3:26)
  6. "Take Her to Sea, Mr. Murdoch" (4:31)
  7. "Hard to Starboard" (6:52)
  8. Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave (3:57)
  9. The Sinking (5:05)
  10. Death of Titanic (8:26)
  11. A Promise Kept (6:03)
  12. A Life So Changed (2:13)
  13. An Ocean of Memories (7:58)
  14. My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme from 'Titanic') (performed by Celine Dion) (5:11)
  15. Hymn to the Sea (6:26)
    DISC 2: Gentlemen, It Has Been a Privilege Playing With You Tonight (58:04)
    I Salonisti
  1. Valse Septembre (3:39)
  2. Marguerite Waltz (2:34)
  3. Wedding Dance (2:30)
  4. Poet and Peasant (6:48)
  5. Blue Danube (6:55)
  6. Song Without Words (2:37)
  7. Estudiantina (3:10)
  8. Vision of Salome (2:42)
  9. Titsy Bitsy Girl (1:35)
  10. Alexander's Ragtime Band (2:27)
  11. Sphinx (3:48)
  12. Barcarole (3:31)
  13. Orpheus (8:40)
  14. Song of Autumn (3:52)
  15. Nearer My God to Thee (2:50)
TITANIC: Collector's Anniversary Edition
2012
Total Time: 249:50
Label:
Sony Masterworks
    DISC 1: Titanic Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Remastered) (72:22)
    Music composed and Conducted by James Horner
  1. Never an Absolution (3:03)
  2. Distant Memories (2:24)
  3. Southampton (4:02)
  4. Rose (2:52)
  5. Leaving Port (3:26)
  6. "Take Her to Sea, Mr. Murdoch" (4:31)
  7. "Hard to Starboard" (6:52)
  8. Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave (3:57)
  9. The Sinking (5:05)
  10. Death of Titanic (8:26)
  11. A Promise Kept (6:03)
  12. A Life So Changed (2:13)
  13. An Ocean of Memories (7:58)
  14. My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme from 'Titanic') (performed by Celine Dion) (5:11)
  15. Hymn to the Sea (6:26)
    DISC 2: Back to Titanic (Remastered) (79:00)
    Music composed and Conducted by James Horner
  1. Titanic Suite *† (19:05)
  2. An Irish Party in Third Class (performed by Gaelic Storm) (3:49)
  3. Alexander's Ragtime Band (performed by I Salonisti) (2:30)
  4. The Portrait (piano solo performed by James Horner) (4:43)
  5. Jack Dawson's Luck (5:38)
  6. A Building Panic (8:09)
  7. Nearer My God to Thee (performed by I Salonisti) (2:49)
  8. Come Josephine, in my Flying Machine (performed by Máire Brennan) (3:32)
  9. Lament (4:36)
  10. A Shore Never Reached * (4:27)
  11. My Heart Will Go On (with dialogue from the film) (performed by Celine Dion) (4:43)
  12. Nearer My God to Thee (performed by Eileen Ivers) (2:22)
  13. Epilogue - The Deep and Timeless Sea *† (12:37)
* Performed by The London Symphony Orchestra and
the Choristers of King's College, Cambridge
    DISC 3: Gentlemen, It Has Been a Privilege Playing With You Tonight (58:04)
    I Salonisti
  1. Valse Septembre (3:39)
  2. Marguerite Waltz (2:34)
  3. Wedding Dance (2:30)
  4. Poet and Peasant (6:48)
  5. Blue Danube (6:55)
  6. Song Without Words (2:37)
  7. Estudiantina (3:10)
  8. Vision of Salome (2:42)
  9. Titsy Bitsy Girl (1:35)
  10. Alexander's Ragtime Band (2:27)
  11. Sphinx (3:48)
  12. Barcarole (3:31)
  13. Orpheus (8:40)
  14. Song of Autumn (3:52)
  15. Nearer My God to Thee (2:50)
    DISC 4: Popular Music From the Titanic Era (37:51)
  1. It's a Long Way to Tipperary (John McCormack) (3:10)
  2. Let Me Call You Sweetheart (Halfway House Dance Orchestra) (3:05)
  3. Vilia (Guy Lombardo & His Orchestra) (2:44)
  4. My Gal Sal (Chick Bullock & His Levee Loungers) (2:57)
  5. Oh! You Beautiful Doll (Chuck Foster & His Orchestra) (2:53)
  6. Martha (Adrian Rollini Trio) (2:58)
  7. In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree (Duke Ellington & His Orchestra) (3:11)
  8. Waiting at the Church (Beatrice Kay) (2:38)
  9. Frasquita Serenade (John Kirby & His Orchestra) (2:40)
  10. Shine On, Harvest Moon (Hal Kemp) (3:06)
  11. From the Land of the Sky Blue Water (Mildred Bailey & Her Orchestra) (2:47)
  12. Loch Lomond (Maxine Sullivan & Her Orchestra) (2:52)
  13. A Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight (Miff Mole's Molers) (2:46)
  14. Nearer My God To Thee (Nelson Eddy) (3:10)
TITANIC: 20th Anniversary Edition
2017
Total Time: 262:50
Label:
La-La Land Records
    DISC 1 (58:29)
  1. Logo / Main Title (2:28)
  2. 2 1/2 Miles Down (10:33)
  3. To the Keldysh / Rose Revealed (1:43)
  4. Distant Memories (2:24)
  5. My Drawing / Relics & Treasures (1:52)
  6. Southampton (4:00)
  7. Leaving Port (3:27)
  8. Take Her to Sea, Mr. Murdoch (4:31)
  9. First Sighting / Rose’s Suicide Attempt (3:05)
  10. Jack Saves Rose (1:42)
  11. The Promenade / Butterfly Comb (2:40)
  12. Rose (2:54)
  13. The Portrait (1:58)
  14. Lovejoy Chases Jack and Rose (2:24)
  15. Lovemaking (2:26)
  16. Hard to Starboard (Extended Version) (7:42)
  17. Rose Frees Jack (2:41)
    DISC 2 (54:59)
  1. A Building Panic (Film Version) (7:25)
  2. Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave (3:56)
  3. Trapped on "D" Deck (8:46)
  4. Murdoch’s Suicide (0:37)
  5. The Sinking (5:06)
  6. Death of Titanic (8:25)
  7. A Promise Kept (6:03)
  8. A Life so Changed (2:14)
  9. A Woman’s Heart Is a Deep Ocean of Secrets (1:43)
  10. An Ocean of Memories (8:00)
  11. Post (2:44)
    DISC 3: Additional Music and Alternates (72:52)
  1. Never an Absolution (3:06)
  2. Trailer (4:12)
  3. The Portrait [Album Version] (4:43)
  4. Logo (Alternate Extended Version) (2:10)
  5. 2 1/2 Miles Down (Alternate) (1:36)
  6. Southampton (Alternate) (3:05)
  7. Leaving Port (with Alternate Ending) (3:00)
  8. Leaving Port (Alternate) (2:15)
  9. Take Her to Sea, Mr. Murdoch (Alternate) (4:29)
  10. Rose (Alternate) (2:58)
  11. Piano Theme—The Portrait (5:00)
  12. Lovejoy Chases Jack (Alternate) (1:55)
  13. Hard to Starboard (Alternate) (6:50)
  14. A Building Panic [Album Suite] (8:05)
  15. Death of Titanic (Alternate) (8:29)
  16. A Promise Kept (Alternate) (4:32)
  17. Hymn to the Sea (6:26)
    DISC 4: Source Music (76:30)
  1. Valse Septembre* (3:43)
  2. Marguerite Waltz* (2:34)
  3. Wedding Dance* (2:30)
  4. Poet and Peasant* (6:48)
  5. Blue Danube* (6:55)
  6. Song Without Words* (2:37)
  7. Estudiantina* (3:11)
  8. Oh, You Beautiful Doll (2:12)
  9. Blarney Pilgrims§ (2:11)
  10. John Ryan’s Polka§ (2:53)
  11. Kesh Jig§ (1:59)
  12. Drowsy Maggie Dance§ (1:22)
  13. Come Josephine in My Flying Machine (1:46)
  14. The Merry Widow (1:30)
  15. Méditation de Thaïs*(4:25)
  16. Vision of Salome*(2:42)
  17. Titsy Bitsy Girl* (1:35)
  18. Alexander’s Ragtime Band* (2:28)
  19. Sphinx* (3:48)
  20. Barcarole* (3:31)
  21. Orpheus* (8:40)
  22. Song of Autumn* (3:53)
  23. Nearer My God to Thee* (Extended Version) (3:14)
** performed by I Salonisti
§ performed by Gaelic Storm
conducted by William Ross
SCORING SESSIONS

Search Film Score...

Latest OST Releases